Library Events

One Community/One Book 2012: The Book

Barefoot Heart Cover

From Barefoot Heart:

In the spring of 1953, Apá interrupted our family life at Tio Alfredo’s to take us to work in the beet fields of Minnesota. Since we had no car, we went in a troca encamisade with another family. The back of this huge truck was covered with dark red canvas… The man who owned the truck was nick-named “El Indio” because his skin, like that of an Indian, was the same color as the canvas, a dark, strong red. I thought he must be very rich to own a huge truck like that. We, on the other hand, owned no car, no house, almost nothing…

Barefoot Heart: Stories of a Migrant Child, was a winner of the American Book Award and the American Library Association’s Alex Award for books with a special appeal for young adults.  It is the One Community/One Book selection for 2012.

To read more:

Humnanities Texas LogoThis program was made possible in part with a grant from Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

One Community/One Book 2013

Join-the-Club-Rosenberg-Tina

Read the Book

Join the Conversation

Hear the Author

Copies of Join the Club: How Peer Pressure Can Transform the World are available in the Briscoe Library, the Ramirez Library at the RAHC, and the library at the Laredo Regional Campus (HM 831 R813j 2012) . The book is also available at the UT Health Science Center Bookstore for $12.71, a 25% discount off the retail price.

Humnanities Texas LogoOne Community/One Book is a project of The Libraries and the Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics. This program was made possible in part with a grant from Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

One Community/One Book 2013: Find Out More

Links to interviews and commentary:
Can Social Networking Cure Social Ills?
By Jeffery D. Sachs
Published: May 20, 2011

Tina Rosenberg: “Join the Club”
Guest Host: Susan Page
The Diane Rehm Show
Tuesday, March 29, 2011

Peer pressure as social cure; Rosenberg’s “Join The Club”
Social Capital Blog
The Saguaro Seminar at Harvard University: Civic Engagement in America
May 16, 2012

Humnanities Texas LogoOne Community/One Book is a project of The Libraries and the Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics. This program was made possible in part with a grant from Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

One Community/One Book 2013: Hear the Author

Hurd Auditorium, School of Nursing

April 4, 9:00 a.m.

Tina Rosenberg

Photo by Noah Greenberg.

Tina Rosenberg is the author of Children of Cain: Violence and the Violent in Latin America; The Haunted Land: Facing Europe’s Ghosts After Communism, which won the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award; and this year’s One Community/One Book selection, Join the Club: How Peer Pressure Can Transform the World.

She was the first freelance journalist to receive a MacArthur Fellowship.

The Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics will bring Tina Rosenberg to campus on Thursday, April 4, 2013, when she will be the keynote speaker at the Center’s 6th Annual Community Service Learning Conference.

Humnanities Texas LogoOne Community/One Book is a project of The Libraries and the Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics. This program was made possible in part with a grant from Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

One Community/One Book 2013: Join the Conversation

Are you interested in receiving a free copy of this year’s One Community/One Book reading selection?

This year The Libraries, in cooperation with the Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics, have chosen Join the Club: How Peer Pressure Can Transform the World for a One Community/One Book read.   Tina Rosenberg, the author of Join the Club, will be the keynote speaker at the CMH&E’s Community Service Learning Conference, which will take place on April 4, 2013.

The Libraries will offer three noon-hour workshops, January 28, February 4, and February 13, to support discussion group leaders and hosts. The workshops are open to faculty, staff, and students of the UT Health Science Center and members of the broader community who are interested in planning a discussion opportunity.

The workshops will be available on request in Harlingen and Laredo via V-tel.

Book discussions will be held throughout February and March, in the weeks leading up to Tina Rosenberg’s keynote address at the Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics Community Service Learning Conference on April 4, 2013.

General Discussion Group Sign in Sheet

Join the Club Discussion Questions

Registration for Facilitator and Host Training Workshops

NOTE: You will receive a message confirming your registration.  Please email Susan Hunnicutt (Hunnicutt@uthscsa.edu) if you do not receive email confirmation within a week of registering.

January Training

Monday, January 28
12:00 noon – 1:00 pm
Collaboratory (Briscoe Library, San Antonio)
Register Online

February Training

Monday, February 4
12:00 noon – 1:00 pm
Collaboratory (Briscoe Library, San Antonio)
Register Online

Wednesday, February 13
12:00 noon – 1:00 pm
Collaboratory (Briscoe Library, San Antonio)
Register Online

January Book Discussions

Wednesday, January 23
PrISM (Professional Interest in Social Media) Book Discussion
2:00 pm – 3:30 pm
Briscoe Library 2.039

March Book Discussions

Tuesday, March 19
Noon to 1:oo p.m.
Howe Conference Room, 5th Floor Briscoe Library
Hosted by Melanie Stone, MPH, M.Ed. and Jessica Mendez, Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics
“Bring your own lunch, light refreshments will be provided.”
Please RSVP to  CSL@uthscsa.edu

April Book Discussions

Tuesday, April 2
6:00 p.m.
Off Campus
Hosted by Jason Rosenfeld, MPH, Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics
RSVP for location to Jason at RosenfeldJ@uthscsa.edu

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One Community/One Book is a project of The Libraries and the Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics. This program was made possible in part with a grant from HumanitiesTexas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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One Community/One Book 2013: The Book

According to Pulitzer Prize-winning author Tina Rosenberg, peer pressure draws its energy from the powerful human desire to be connected to others. Because the desire for connection is so strong, peer pressure is “a mighty and terrible force—so powerful that, for the vast majority of people, the best antidote to it is more peer pressure.”

What do you think? Is peer pressure a tool that can be employed in the service of better health?
This is one question that will be considered during the UT Health Science Center’s fifth One Community/One Book program, which will feature Rosenberg’s book, Join the Club: How Peer Pressure Can Transform the World.

To read more:

  • Borrow from the UTHSC Libraries
  • Borrow from the San Antonio Public Library (En Español)
  • Purchase at the UT Health Science Center Bookstore for $12.71, at 25% off the retail price

Humnanities Texas LogoOne Community/One Book is a project of The Libraries and the Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics. This program was made possible in part with a grant from Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

One Community/One Book: Find Out More

 
OCOB Banner
 

Culture Dish: Rebecca Skloot’s Blog

Other Writings

Some Related Articles Indexed in PubMed

Reviews of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

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Past Events at the Libraries

Illustration of medieval medical practices by Hieronymus Brunschwig, 1494

Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance Science, Magic and Medicine

The UT Health Science Center Libraries are pleased to announce that Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance Science, Magic, and Medicine will visit the Briscoe Library from October 11 to November 6, 2010. The traveling exhibit, produced by the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, and coordinated by the American Library Association, uses materials from the historical collections of the National Library of Medicine to explore Harry Potter’s world and its roots in Renaissance traditions. Further information about this event can be found here.

One Community/One Book

One Community/One Book Spring 2013: Join the Club

One Community/OneBook 2012: Barefoot Heart: Stories of a Migrant Child

2012′s book selection was Barefoot Heart: Stories of a Migrant Child by Elva Treviño Hart. Visit the event page for more information about the book and the talk.

One Community/One Book 2010: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

2010′s One Community/One Book was The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot. The author spoke at the Frank Bryant Jr., MD Memorial Lecture on October 15th, 2010.

One Community / One Book 2009: Final Exam

“Dr. Pauline Chen’s Final Exam: A Surgeon’s Reflections on Mortality was the One Community/ One Book selection for 2009. Dr. Chen spoke at Transplant Center grand rounds on the Morning of September 25, and later received a standing ovation for her noon-hour talk in the Parman Auditorium. More than 100 people—students, faculty and staff, participated in planned discussion groups in the weeks leading up to Dr. Chen’s talk. For more information about 2009′s programs, visit the information page.

One Community / One Book 2008: Mountains Beyond Mountains

Be a part of the One Community / One Book 2008. Read the book Mountains Beyond Mountains and then participate in program activities. For a schedule of activities and information about the book visit the One Community / One Book information page.

Other Events

4th Binational Conference for Promotores de Salud

Approximately 175 promotores, or community health workers, from around South Texas convened for the 4th Binational Conference for Promotores de Salud in South Padre Island, Texas. The conference theme was “Healthy Minds, Healthy Bodies” and featured programs on a variety of mental health topics. Dr. Ana Nogales, a clinical psychologist and author of Latina Power, was the keynote speaker. The staff of the Ramirez Library, in partnership with several local community health agencies and the NN/LM SCR, organized the conference. For more information visit the Conference Web site.

Changing the Face of Medicine
Changing the Face of Medicine, an exhibit from the National Library of Medicine, was on display at the Briscoe Library from late October until November 21, 2008.

getHIP

getHIP 2010
getHip 2010, held on April 14th 2010, was the second school health conference organized by the UT Health Science Center Libraries. Further information about this event can be found here.
getHIP 2008
Held on Saturday, June 7 2008, the getHIP conference welcomed 121 school librarians, school nurses, teachers, school administrators, health educators, health sciences librarians and others to promote a coordinated approach to school health. More information can be found here.

Rare Anatomical Texts on View in Nixon Library April 15

Tables of the skeleton and muscles of the human body by Bernhard Siegfried Albinus

Tables of the skeleton and muscles of the human body by Bernhard Siegfried Albinus

The P. I. Nixon Medical Historical Library will display rare anatomical and other texts in the collection on Tuesday, April 15th, from 4 to 6 pm.   The library is located on the 5th floor of the Briscoe Library on the Long Campus of the UT Health Science Center.

Forty-two books from the 15th—18th centuries will be on display including Albinus’ Tables of the skeleton and muscles of the human body, Charles Bell’s Illustrations of the great operations of surgery, Harvey’s Anatomical exercitations concerning the generation of living creatures, Hooke’s Micrographia,  John Hunter’s The natural history of the human teeth, William Hunter’s Anatomia uteri humani gravidi tabulis illustrate, and Vesalius’ De humani corporis fabrica libri septem.

These books are rarely on display, so come take the opportunity to enjoy them.

 

Resources for Discussion Group Leaders

Questions Set 1

  1. Final Exam is about Pauline Chen’s education by two very different sets of teachers: doctors and patients. What does she learn from doctors? What does she learn from patients? In what ways are these lessons incompatible? Have you experienced or heard of something similar?
  2. Chen draws upon her experiences with real patients. What do these people add to the story she tells in Final Exam?
  3. In Chapter 1, Pauline Chen writes: “The daily confrontation with a dead body, the first stranger’s body that medical students may have ever examined so closely, marks a point of high anxiety in medical education.” During your professional education, can you describe any events similar to Pauline Chen’s experiences in anatomy class? How did you learn to cope with the feelings and anxiety that you may not have encountered before?
  4. What makes Chen’s story compelling and interesting to you? In what ways does Final Exam read more like a novel than a book of nonfiction?
  5. Reflect on Chen’s statement that doctors “learn not only to avoid but also to define death as the result of errors, imperfect technique, and poor judgment. Death is no longer a natural event but a ritual gone awry” [p. 95]. What are the consequences, for patients and for health care professionals, of this way of defining death?
  6. Has reading Final Exam caused you to think differently about life and death? How could you use the book to start a discussion with your family about their end-of-life wishes?

Questions Set 2

Adapted from the LitLovers website

  1. Pauline Chen paints a detailed culture of the professional culture in which she works. What does she celebrate in that culture? What does she criticize?
  2. Does she wish to preserve or reform the professional culture? If reform, in what way? What would be gained and what would be at risk if the professional culture in which she works was changed as she imagines?
  3. How does the professional culture described in Final Exam differ from the professional culture in which you work? How is it similar?
  4. Does Final Exam offer a central idea or premise? Do you think the problems Pauline Chen raises are personal, spiritual, societal, global, economic or scientific?

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