About the Library

Past Events at the Libraries

One Community/One Book

One Community/One Book 2104: Redeployment

One Community/One Book Spring 2013: Join the Club

One Community/OneBook 2012: Barefoot Heart: Stories of a Migrant Child

2012’s book selection was Barefoot Heart: Stories of a Migrant Child by Elva Treviño Hart. Visit the event page for more information about the book and the talk.

One Community/One Book 2010: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

2010’s One Community/One Book was The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot. The author spoke at the Frank Bryant Jr., MD Memorial Lecture on October 15th, 2010.

One Community / One Book 2009: Final Exam

“Dr. Pauline Chen’s Final Exam: A Surgeon’s Reflections on Mortality was the One Community/ One Book selection for 2009. Dr. Chen spoke at Transplant Center grand rounds on the Morning of September 25, and later received a standing ovation for her noon-hour talk in the Parman Auditorium. More than 100 people—students, faculty and staff, participated in planned discussion groups in the weeks leading up to Dr. Chen’s talk. For more information about 2009’s programs, visit the information page.

One Community / One Book 2008: Mountains Beyond Mountains

Be a part of the One Community / One Book 2008. Read the book Mountains Beyond Mountains and then participate in program activities. For a schedule of activities and information about the book visit the One Community / One Book information page.

Other Events

Illustration of medieval medical practices by Hieronymus Brunschwig, 1494

Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance Science, Magic and Medicine

From October 11th-November 6th 2010 the Libraries hosted Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance Science, Magic, and Medicine, a traveling exhibit from the National Library of Medicine and the American Library Association.

The exhibit used materials from the NLM’s historical collections to explore Harry Potterls world and its roots in Renaissance traditions. View further information about this past event.

Policies for Emergency Closure

 

Before closing the library, always contact the Senior Library Director and the VP for Academic, Faculty and Student Affairs’ office (210-567-2004) for approval to close.  In the event of an emergency or campus closure, the Office of the President well send an HSC Alert through email and text message to mobile telephones. If the announcement says that only essential personnel must report to work, the Library will be closed. All staff are expected to sign up for HSC Alerts in order to be notified of campus closures.

The UT Health Science Center Handbook of Operational Procedures (http://www.uthscsa.edu/hop2000/8.3.1.pdf) outlines procedures for closing of the campus due to severe weather or during an emergency.  Campus Status information can be found on this site: http://www.uthscsa.edu/status.asp.

Notifications: If the library does not open on time or has an early closure, library staff will notify the public of any closures and status of the library through Web site updates, phone messages, social media and signage.

Inclement weather:  During business hours, the Library will close if the University President or his designee declares a campus closure and cancellation of classes due to extreme weather or an emergency or disaster.  After 5 pm or on weekends the Senior Library Director or his designee has authority to close the Library in case of extreme weather or an emergency.  Hours of work missed will be recorded as Administrative Leave. However, if an employee received prior approval for vacation or sick leave, then the absence will be recorded as vacation or sick leave, respectively.

The Library will open if the weather is severe but the campus is not closed.  Staff members are expected to make every reasonable effort to report to work.  If staff cannot safely make it to work, they should notify their supervisor by telephone immediately.  Hours of work missed if the campus is not closed will be handled like other absences and charged to vacation leave, or pay will be reduced.

Physical disaster that poses a threat to lives or property:  the Library will be evacuated and will close immediately.

Power failure:  University Police should be contacted at 7-2800. In the event of a power failure, the following guidelines apply:

 

Daylight Hours After Dark
Library will remain open for 30 minutes, to allow time for power to be restored Library will remain open for 15 minutes to allow time for power to be restored
After 30 minutes, the Library will be evacuated After 15 minutes the Library will be evacuated
Library staff must remain in contact for one additional hour Library staff must remain in contact for one additional hour
If the power is off for a total of 90 minutes, then the Library may be closed and staff sent home If power is not restored after a total of 30 minutes, then the Library will be closed and staff sent home
If power is restored earlier than 6 hours prior to closing time, night or weekend staff must return to re-open the Library If power is restored earlier than 6 hours prior to closing time, night or weekend staff must return to re-open the Library

 

Telephone outage:  As long as there is access to a cell phone to call UT Police, the library will remain open.

Water shutdown:  If the water is shut down in only the library building, the library will remain open. If the shutdown affects the Library and lecture hall buildings, then the Library will close due to unavailability of restrooms. If water is restored earlier than 6 hours prior to closing time, Library staff will return to re-open the Library.

Air conditioning shutdown: Generally, the Library will not close if the air conditioning is down for just a few hours or overnight. The decision to close is at the discretion of the Senior Library Director, and can be based upon the outside temperature at the time.

 

Back to Disaster Plan

Procedures for Non-Emergency Safety or Security Situations

 

Security and safety concerns should be reported immediately to the Circulation Supervisor or Circulation staff.  Depending on the circumstances, Circulation staff may call the Circulation Supervisor or the Senior Director of Libraries. If the situation warrants it, University Police should be called at 911 or 210-567-2800. If UT Police are called, the Senior Director of Libraries should be notified.

If a problem occurs on weekends or after 5 p.m., contact the Library Administration Chain of Command.  Staff Emergency Contact Information is on the Staff Intranet (not publicly available).

 

Unattended children

Children under the age of 15 must be accompanied by a supervising adult at all times. Unattended children under the age of 15 should be reported to the Access Services Supervisor on duty.  The child should be asked to contact his/her parent or guardian.  If the supervising adult is not in the Library, University Police should be contacted.  This policy protects the child from possible harm.

 

Back to Disaster Plan

Promotores and Community Health Worker Groups Hosted by UT Health Science Center Libraries

The UT Health Science Center Libraries outreach services provide training for area health professionals as well as public health workers in South Texas. Public health workers include groups like promotores and community health workers. Training features resources from the National Library of Medicine such as MedLinePlus and PubMed.

RAHCM+Demo_5-5-15smallPictured here is Ramirez Library Associate Director Kathy Carter with a workshop group of 51 area promotores de salud who were given an overview of MedlinePlus Español, highlighting its accessibility via smartphones and other mobile devices.

CHWGroupMeeting_5-30-15Earlier this year, the Briscoe Library hosted a meeting for area Community Health Workers (CHWs) who learned about health care research involving CHWs through PubMed literature searching and about opportunities for outreach collaboration with the UT Health Science Center Libraries.

Register Now for the Friends of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library Dinner

 

Speaker: Gary Taubes

Based on his April 2011 New York Times Magazine cover article and his latest book (The Case Against Sugar), Gary Taubes will discuss the history, politics, and science of sugar and high fructose corn syrup, arguing that these sweeteners may indeed be far more harmful to our health than public health authorities have been willing to accept.

For more information about Gary Taubes visit: https://www.prhspeakers.com/speaker/gary-taubes

 

Dinner Details:

Date: Friday, October 26, 2018

Time: Meet & Greet: 6:30 PM | Dinner: 7:00 PM

Dinner, dessert, wine, coffee, or tea

Speaker: 8:00 p.m.

Location: Valero Community Engagement Center located at the San Antonio Food Bank,

5200 Enrique Pkwy, San Antonio, TX 78227.

Cost: $55 per person, $35 for students.

Paid sponsorships for students available upon request. Advanced registration is required

Registration deadline is Monday, October 15, 2018.

Register online at: https://uthscsa.libwizard.com/nixondinner

For more information about the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library contact Andrea N. Schorr, Head of Resource Management, at (210) 567-2403 or schorr@uthscsa.edu.

P.I. Nixon Library website: http://library.uthscsa.edu/2011/11/nixon-library/

Registration Deadline October 15th for Nixon Library Dinner

At the annual dinner of the Friends of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library dinner, you will have the chance to hear speaker Gary Taubes discuss the history, politics, and science of sugar and high fructose corn syrup, arguing that these sweeteners may indeed be far more harmful to our health than public health authorities have been willing to accept.

Register online at: https://uthscsa.libwizard.com/nixondinner

Date: Friday, October 26, 2018

Time: Meet & Greet: 6:30 PM | Dinner: 7:00 PM

Dinner, dessert, wine, coffee, or tea

Speaker: 8:00 p.m. followed by book signing 

Location: Valero Community Engagement Center located at the San Antonio Food Bank,

5200 Enrique Pkwy, San Antonio, TX 78227.

Cost: $55 per person, $35 for students.

Paid sponsorships for students available upon request. Advanced registration is required

For more information about Gary Taubes visit: https://www.prhspeakers.com/speaker/gary-taubes

Resources for Discussion Group Leaders

Questions Set 1

  1. Final Exam is about Pauline Chen’s education by two very different sets of teachers: doctors and patients. What does she learn from doctors? What does she learn from patients? In what ways are these lessons incompatible? Have you experienced or heard of something similar?
  2. Chen draws upon her experiences with real patients. What do these people add to the story she tells in Final Exam?
  3. In Chapter 1, Pauline Chen writes: “The daily confrontation with a dead body, the first stranger’s body that medical students may have ever examined so closely, marks a point of high anxiety in medical education.” During your professional education, can you describe any events similar to Pauline Chen’s experiences in anatomy class? How did you learn to cope with the feelings and anxiety that you may not have encountered before?
  4. What makes Chen’s story compelling and interesting to you? In what ways does Final Exam read more like a novel than a book of nonfiction?
  5. Reflect on Chen’s statement that doctors “learn not only to avoid but also to define death as the result of errors, imperfect technique, and poor judgment. Death is no longer a natural event but a ritual gone awry” [p. 95]. What are the consequences, for patients and for health care professionals, of this way of defining death?
  6. Has reading Final Exam caused you to think differently about life and death? How could you use the book to start a discussion with your family about their end-of-life wishes?

Questions Set 2

Adapted from the LitLovers website

  1. Pauline Chen paints a detailed culture of the professional culture in which she works. What does she celebrate in that culture? What does she criticize?
  2. Does she wish to preserve or reform the professional culture? If reform, in what way? What would be gained and what would be at risk if the professional culture in which she works was changed as she imagines?
  3. How does the professional culture described in Final Exam differ from the professional culture in which you work? How is it similar?
  4. Does Final Exam offer a central idea or premise? Do you think the problems Pauline Chen raises are personal, spiritual, societal, global, economic or scientific?

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Resources for Distance Learning Students

S.T.E.A.M Night at Hoffman Elementary

STEAMNight_2-3-16

Andrea N. Schorr, Metadata and Collection Management Librarian at the UT Health Science Center Briscoe Library, provided an exhibit for Hoffman Elementary students and their parents at the first annual S.T.E.A.M Night (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math) on February 3rd. The event allowed students to explore future careers and new ideas about innovations and technology. Each student visiting the exhibit table was given a sticker saying “Future Health Science Librarian” prompting one little boy to ask, “Can boys be librarians?”

On display at the Briscoe Library exhibit were resources from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) including TOXinvaders, a new mobile game about chemistry, the environment, and health; and ToxMystery, created by the NLM to help children from 7-11 years old learn about household chemical hazards. Students also had a chance to see and handle objects produced by the new Briscoe Library 3-D printer.

As a Resource Library with the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM), the UT Health Science Center Briscoe Library provides a variety of services to individuals and groups throughout South Texas including:

• Exhibits at health fairs and other health-related events like school science fairs
• Presentations for health consumers (including students and parents), area health professionals, and librarians, etc.
• Instruction on finding and evaluating reliable health information, with a focus on resources from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH)
• Support for area organizations in identifying funding opportunities from the NN/LM or NLM and the preparation of proposals

To schedule an event or to request assistance with an outreach activity or project, contact the Briscoe Library’s Head of Outreach Services, Peg Seger.

San Fernando Health and Safety Fair Celebrates 25th Anniversary

SanFernandoLogo_10-3-15

This year was the 25th Anniversary of the San Fernando Health & Safety Fair. The fair offers health screening to individuals in the community who have no insurance or are under insured. Over 400 volunteer doctors, nurses, health specialists, community volunteers and students provide the screening services.

Briscoe Library staff Patrick Lemelle and Peg Seger teamed up again this year on October 3rd to provide an exhibit table at the fair featuring reliable consumer health information from the National Library of Medicine.

Peg&Patrick_SanFernando_10-3-15