About the Library

One Community/One Book 2013: Hear the Author

Hurd Auditorium, School of Nursing

April 4, 9:00 a.m.

Tina Rosenberg

Photo by Noah Greenberg.

Tina Rosenberg is the author of Children of Cain: Violence and the Violent in Latin America; The Haunted Land: Facing Europe’s Ghosts After Communism, which won the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award; and this year’s One Community/One Book selection, Join the Club: How Peer Pressure Can Transform the World.

She was the first freelance journalist to receive a MacArthur Fellowship.

The Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics will bring Tina Rosenberg to campus on Thursday, April 4, 2013, when she will be the keynote speaker at the Center’s 6th Annual Community Service Learning Conference.

Humnanities Texas LogoOne Community/One Book is a project of The Libraries and the Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics. This program was made possible in part with a grant from Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

One Community/One Book 2013: Join the Conversation

Are you interested in receiving a free copy of this year’s One Community/One Book reading selection?

This year The Libraries, in cooperation with the Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics, have chosen Join the Club: How Peer Pressure Can Transform the World for a One Community/One Book read.   Tina Rosenberg, the author of Join the Club, will be the keynote speaker at the CMH&E’s Community Service Learning Conference, which will take place on April 4, 2013.

The Libraries will offer three noon-hour workshops, January 28, February 4, and February 13, to support discussion group leaders and hosts. The workshops are open to faculty, staff, and students of the UT Health Science Center and members of the broader community who are interested in planning a discussion opportunity.

The workshops will be available on request in Harlingen and Laredo via V-tel.

Book discussions will be held throughout February and March, in the weeks leading up to Tina Rosenberg’s keynote address at the Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics Community Service Learning Conference on April 4, 2013.

General Discussion Group Sign in Sheet

Join the Club Discussion Questions

Registration for Facilitator and Host Training Workshops

NOTE: You will receive a message confirming your registration.  Please email Susan Hunnicutt (Hunnicutt@uthscsa.edu) if you do not receive email confirmation within a week of registering.

January Training

Monday, January 28
12:00 noon – 1:00 pm
Collaboratory (Briscoe Library, San Antonio)
Register Online

February Training

Monday, February 4
12:00 noon – 1:00 pm
Collaboratory (Briscoe Library, San Antonio)
Register Online

Wednesday, February 13
12:00 noon – 1:00 pm
Collaboratory (Briscoe Library, San Antonio)
Register Online

January Book Discussions

Wednesday, January 23
PrISM (Professional Interest in Social Media) Book Discussion
2:00 pm – 3:30 pm
Briscoe Library 2.039

March Book Discussions

Tuesday, March 19
Noon to 1:oo p.m.
Howe Conference Room, 5th Floor Briscoe Library
Hosted by Melanie Stone, MPH, M.Ed. and Jessica Mendez, Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics
“Bring your own lunch, light refreshments will be provided.”
Please RSVP to  CSL@uthscsa.edu

April Book Discussions

Tuesday, April 2
6:00 p.m.
Off Campus
Hosted by Jason Rosenfeld, MPH, Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics
RSVP for location to Jason at RosenfeldJ@uthscsa.edu

Humnanities Texas Logo

One Community/One Book is a project of The Libraries and the Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics. This program was made possible in part with a grant from HumanitiesTexas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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One Community/One Book 2013: The Book

According to Pulitzer Prize-winning author Tina Rosenberg, peer pressure draws its energy from the powerful human desire to be connected to others. Because the desire for connection is so strong, peer pressure is “a mighty and terrible force—so powerful that, for the vast majority of people, the best antidote to it is more peer pressure.”

What do you think? Is peer pressure a tool that can be employed in the service of better health?
This is one question that will be considered during the UT Health Science Center’s fifth One Community/One Book program, which will feature Rosenberg’s book, Join the Club: How Peer Pressure Can Transform the World.

To read more:

  • Borrow from the UTHSC Libraries
  • Borrow from the San Antonio Public Library (En Español)
  • Purchase at the UT Health Science Center Bookstore for $12.71, at 25% off the retail price

Humnanities Texas LogoOne Community/One Book is a project of The Libraries and the Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics. This program was made possible in part with a grant from Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

One Community/One Book: Find Out More

 
OCOB Banner
 

Culture Dish: Rebecca Skloot’s Blog

Other Writings

Some Related Articles Indexed in PubMed

Reviews of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

Humnanities Texas Logo

P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library

Interior photograph of the Nixon Library

 

Monday-Friday Saturday Sunday
8:00 a.m. – 5 p.m. Closed Closed

There is no charge to view the collections. If you have specific research needs call or e-mail to make an appointment, as some materials are located remotely.

Address & Contact Information

7703 Floyd Curl Dr.
San Antonio TX, 78248
5th floor, Briscoe Library
(210) 567-2400

The Special Collections of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library

San Antonio physician and historian Dr. Pat Ireland Nixon lent his name to what is now a treasure-trove of antiquarian texts, dating from the 15th to the early 20th century. Ophthalmology, surgery, and anatomy are particular strengths of the Nixon Library. Also contained within the Special Collections are classic European and early American first editions, such as Nightingale’s Notes on Nursing and Darwin’s On the Origin of Species. A number of magnificent anatomical atlases feature illustrations that qualify as works of art in their own right.

Photograph of Dr Charleen Moore and two students during the 2007 elective History of AnatomyOriginally donated to the Health Science Center in the early 1970s by the Bexar County Medical Society, the superb core collection has expanded to contain close to 5000 volumes of treasured medical texts, including important works by Vesalius (De Humani Corporis Fabrica – 1543), Albinus (Tables of the Skeleton and Muscles of the Human Body – 1749), Celsus (De Medicina – 1481), Avicenna (The Canon of Medicine – 1486), Burton (Anatomy of Melancholy – 1632), and Hooke (The Micrographia – 1667).

The library regularly features holdings in the Treasures of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library Blog

Tours of the Nixon Library, including viewings of rare books within subject areas, can be arranged by contacting Assistant Director for Special Collections Anne Comeaux at (210) 567-2428 or email comeaux@uthscsa.edu. Selected materials from the Nixon Library may also be viewed online in the UTHSC Digital Archive / History of Medicine Collection and the Portal to Texas History.

Policies for the Use of Materials in the Special Collections

 

Visit the Digital Archive

About the Image: 4th year medical students Nadine Terrazas and Robyn Treadwell visit the P.I. Nixon Library in April 2007 during the senior medical school elective, History of Anatomy In Situ, directed by Charleen M. Moore, PhD, Professor in the Department of Cellular and Structural Biology.

The Friends of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library

The Nixon Library has an active Friends group that meets regularly for lectures, films, and dinners. Membership is open to all. For more information, visit the Friends page.

Popular books on the history of medicine

The Friends of the P.I. Nixon Library have purchased a collection of popular books on the history of medicine. The books highlight significant periods and events in medical history and are located in the library’s general collection. To view a complete list of titles and locations click here.

Library ExhibitsIllustration of a man using a dog to pull out a mandrake

Exhibits on medical historical topics are researched and mounted for the Health Science Center by various Special Collections staff. These displays are available as traveling exhibitions to other institutions as an educational service offered by the Library.  The Library also sometimes mounts exhibits from sources outside the Health Science Center.  Contact Jonquil Fieldman, Director of Briscoe Library and Outreach Services, at email feldman@uthscsa.edu or (210) 567-2430 if you have an exhibit you would like displayed in the library.

About the Image: A man uses a dog to pull a mandrake from the ground from Histoire de la medecine, de la pharmacie, de l’art dentaire et de l’art veterinaire by Jacques Poulet, Jean-Charles Sournia, and Marcel Martiny. (Click image for larger view.) This book is available to view in the P.I. Nixon Library.

University Archives and Local History Materials

Bexar County and South Texas have a rich medical heritage. The University Archives houses historical records of the University and the development of medicine in Bexar County and South Texas. The Archives provides a reference service for the Health Science Center community and a repository for the preservation of historically important University records.

You can find detailed information about many of our archival collections at Texas Archival Resources Online.

Included in the collection are:

  • University publications
  • correspondence of key officials
  • minutes
  • student yearbooks
  • papers of early San Antonio physicians
  • and more

The Special Collections staff actively seek to acquire materials related to the history of medicine, including:

  • manuscripts
  • journals and account books of local physicians
  • photographs of area hospitals and health practitioners
  • records of local medical organizations

Persons owning such materials are encouraged to donate them so that they may be preserved and made available for research. The community is also reminded that materials that do not seem valuable today may provide an important historical insight in the future.

For more information about the archives or to make an appointment to view archival materials, contact Library Archival Assistant Mellisa DeThorne at 210-567-2470, email dethorne@uthscsa.edu or Assistant Director for Special Collections Anne Comeaux at 210-567-2428, email comeaux@uthscsa.edu.

Past Events at the Libraries

Illustration of medieval medical practices by Hieronymus Brunschwig, 1494

Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance Science, Magic and Medicine

The UT Health Science Center Libraries are pleased to announce that Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance Science, Magic, and Medicine will visit the Briscoe Library from October 11 to November 6, 2010. The traveling exhibit, produced by the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, and coordinated by the American Library Association, uses materials from the historical collections of the National Library of Medicine to explore Harry Potter’s world and its roots in Renaissance traditions. Further information about this event can be found here.

One Community/One Book

One Community/One Book Spring 2013: Join the Club

One Community/OneBook 2012: Barefoot Heart: Stories of a Migrant Child

2012′s book selection was Barefoot Heart: Stories of a Migrant Child by Elva Treviño Hart. Visit the event page for more information about the book and the talk.

One Community/One Book 2010: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

2010′s One Community/One Book was The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot. The author spoke at the Frank Bryant Jr., MD Memorial Lecture on October 15th, 2010.

One Community / One Book 2009: Final Exam

“Dr. Pauline Chen’s Final Exam: A Surgeon’s Reflections on Mortality was the One Community/ One Book selection for 2009. Dr. Chen spoke at Transplant Center grand rounds on the Morning of September 25, and later received a standing ovation for her noon-hour talk in the Parman Auditorium. More than 100 people—students, faculty and staff, participated in planned discussion groups in the weeks leading up to Dr. Chen’s talk. For more information about 2009′s programs, visit the information page.

One Community / One Book 2008: Mountains Beyond Mountains

Be a part of the One Community / One Book 2008. Read the book Mountains Beyond Mountains and then participate in program activities. For a schedule of activities and information about the book visit the One Community / One Book information page.

Other Events

4th Binational Conference for Promotores de Salud

Approximately 175 promotores, or community health workers, from around South Texas convened for the 4th Binational Conference for Promotores de Salud in South Padre Island, Texas. The conference theme was “Healthy Minds, Healthy Bodies” and featured programs on a variety of mental health topics. Dr. Ana Nogales, a clinical psychologist and author of Latina Power, was the keynote speaker. The staff of the Ramirez Library, in partnership with several local community health agencies and the NN/LM SCR, organized the conference. For more information visit the Conference Web site.

Changing the Face of Medicine
Changing the Face of Medicine, an exhibit from the National Library of Medicine, was on display at the Briscoe Library from late October until November 21, 2008.

getHIP

getHIP 2010
getHip 2010, held on April 14th 2010, was the second school health conference organized by the UT Health Science Center Libraries. Further information about this event can be found here.
getHIP 2008
Held on Saturday, June 7 2008, the getHIP conference welcomed 121 school librarians, school nurses, teachers, school administrators, health educators, health sciences librarians and others to promote a coordinated approach to school health. More information can be found here.

Photographers/Disaster Documentation Representatives: Robert Zuniga & Walter Creech

Robert Zuniga–Office Phone:  210-567-2084

Walter Creech–Office Phone: 210-567-2462

Emergency Contact Information is on the Staff Intranet (not publicly available)

Duties related to Disaster Planning and Recovery

  • Maintains an inventory of library possessions
  • Photographs the damage to the collections and library contents, as well as damage to the building, if appropriate
  • Maintains a photographic record of recovery efforts

 

Back to Library Disaster Team list.


Policies for Emergency Closure

 

In the event of an emergency or campus closure, the Office of the President well send an HSC Alert through email and text message to mobile telephones. If the announcement says that only essential personnel must report to work, the Library will be closed. All staff are expected to sign up for HSC Alerts.

The UT Health Science Center Handbook of Operational Procedures (http://www.uthscsa.edu/hop2000/8.3.1.pdf) outlines procedures for closing of the campus due to severe weather or during an emergency.  Campus Status information can be found on this site: http://www.uthscsa.edu/status.asp.

 

Physical disaster that poses a threat to lives or property:  the Library will close immediately.


Power failure:  University Police should be contacted at 7-2800.  Always contact the Executive Director of Libraries and the VP for Academic, Faculty and Student Affairs’ office (210-567-2004) for approval to close.  If it is determined the cause is mechanical failure, the following guidelines apply:

 

Daylight Hours After Dark
Library will remain open for 30 minutes, to allow time for power to be restored Library will remain open for 15 minutes to allow time for power to be restored
After 30 minutes, the Library will be evacuated After 15 minutes the Library will be evacuated
Library staff must remain in contact for one additional hour Library staff must remain in contact for one additional hour
If the power is off for a total of 90 minutes, then the Library may be closed and staff sent home If power is not restored after a total of 30 minutes, then the Library will be closed and staff sent home
If power is restored earlier than 6 hours prior to closing time, night or weekend staff must return to re-open the Library If power is restored earlier than 6 hours prior to closing time, night or weekend staff must return to re-open the Library

 

Inclement weather:  During business hours, the Library will close if the University President or his designee declares a campus closure and cancellation of classes due to extreme weather or an emergency or disaster.  After 5 pm or on weekends the Executive Director of Libraries or her designee has authority to close the Library in case of extreme weather or an emergency.  Hours of work missed will be recorded as Administrative Leave. However, if an employee received prior approval for vacation or sick leave, then the absence will be recorded as vacation or sick leave, respectively.

The Library will open if the weather is severe but the campus is not closed.  Staff members are expected to make every reasonable effort to report to work.  If staff cannot safely make it to work, they should notify their supervisor by telephone immediately.  Hours of work missed if the campus is not closed will be handled like other absences and charged to vacation leave or pay will be reduced.

 

Back to Disaster Plan

Procedures for Campus Emergency Situations

If a disaster occurs, regular contact should be maintained with UT Police:

San Antonio                       911 or 210-567-2800

Harlingen                            956-365-8900

Laredo                                  956-523-7414

The following Library Administration personnel should be notified that 911 has been dialed, during or after business hours:

 

Executive Director of Libraries Rajia Tobia
Director of Library and Outreach Services Jonquil Feldman
Head of Library Technology Eric Willman
Head of Collection Resources John Weed
Asst. Dir., Digital and Special Collections Anne Comeaux
Library Administrator Herlinda Howard

 

Staff Emergency Contact Information is on the Staff Intranet (not publicly available).

Procedures for Emergency Campus Situations

 

Active Shooter

If approached by a threatening person in the library or if a threatening situation is observed between staff and/or library users, staff members should either call the University Police (911 or 210-567-2800) directly or alert another staff member to do so.

If the person is directly in front of you or near the phone, the code for alerting police and other staff that there is a physical threat involved is to ask for Form 10-33.  A Panic Button located at the Circulation Desk will ring directly at the UT Police station.

If an active shooter (person carrying a weapon and/or actively engaged in shooting) is in the building, evacuate if possible. If unable to evacuate or if unsure where the shooter is, hide in a safe place where the shooter is less likely to find you.  Staff offices and most classrooms are best because they can be locked from inside.  Once in a safe place, call UT Police and explain the situation. Silence all cell phones and pagers.

If a suspect is in the vicinity, the university will notify the campus through HSC Alerts. Follow directions on how to react. If directed to evacuate the building and/or campus, grab your wallet/purse, lock your office door and evacuate immediately through the nearest exit and help others to escape, if possible.

More information can be found in this Active Shooter Pocket Card.

Biological Agents

Biological agents are organisms or toxins that have illness-producing effects on people, livestock and crops.  Because biological agents cannot necessarily be detected and may take time to grow and cause a disease, it is almost impossible to know that a biological attack has occurred.  If government officials become aware of a biological attack through an informant or warning by terrorists, they would most likely instruct citizens to either seek shelter where they are and seal the premises or evacuate immediately.  A person affected by a biological agent requires the immediate attention of professional medical personnel.  Some agents are contagious, and victims may need to be quarantined.  Also, some medical facilities may not receive victims for fear of contaminating the hospital population.  Contact UT Police, or Environmental Health & Safety officers and Library Administration.  Library Administration will determine whether to activate the Library Disaster Team.

Bomb Explosion

Evacuate the building.  If items are falling off bookshelves or from the ceiling, get under a sturdy table or desk until it is safe to leave the building.  Call University Police at 911. Contact Library Administration.  They will determine whether to activate the Library Disaster Team.

Bomb Threat

When responding to a phone-in bomb threat, remain calm and take the blow-listed steps. Get as much information from the caller as possible. Keep the caller on the line and take notes on everything that is said.  If you have caller ID, note the phone number of caller. The following specific questions should be asked of the caller, even though it is unlikely the caller will provide personal information:

  • When is the bomb going to explode?
  • Where is the bomb right now?
  • What does the bomb look like?
  • What kind of bomb is it?
  • What will cause it to explode?
  • Did you place the bomb?
  • Why did you place the bomb?
  • Where are you calling from?
  • What is your address?
  • What is your name?
  • What is your phone number?

Write down the exact words of the call. Include any slang, jargon, or other distinctive words used.  Record the time that the call was received, the time the bomb is supposed to explode, and the time the call ends. Be alert to the characteristics of the caller’s voice and the background noises of the call.   Record the following information:

  • Male or female
  • Estimated age
  • Tone of voice
  • Accent
  • Background noises
  • Is the voice familiar?

If the caller allows conversation to continue, try to get to another telephone to alert the telephone operator.  Do not hang up because the operator may be able to assist in tracing the call.

After you have notified UT Police of a bomb threat, do not touch any suspicious packages.  Evacuate the building.

Chemical Agents

Chemical agents are poisonous gases, liquids or solids that have toxic effects on people, animals or plants.  Most chemical agents cause serious injuries or death.  Severity of injuries depends on the type and amount of the chemical agent used, and the duration of exposure.

In the event of a chemical agent attack, seek shelter immediately.  Do not leave the shelter to assist others as you could be fatally harmed.  Contact UT Police, or Environmental Health & Safety officers and Library Administration.  Library Administration will determine whether to activate the Library Disaster Team.

Fire

If you notice or detect smoke or fire:

  • Activate the alarm, if it has not already been activated
  • Call the University Police (911)—they will call the fire department
  • Evacuate the area

If the alarm sounds, it is the responsibility of University Police to investigate its source.  If the alarm is not silenced within one minute execute evacuation procedures.

Flooding (Broken Pipes, etc.)

If you detect leaks or water damage to library materials, or if you enter a flooded area of the library, contact the Library Administration, who will determine whether to activate the Library Disaster Team. Also contact Facilities Management immediately.

Procedures:

  • Do not touch or step into standing water—it could be electrified
  • Do not touch a person who has been electrocuted.  Dial 911 for help.
  • Do not touch or move wet books or other materials unless directed.
  • Locate the water source.  If water is coming from above, cover the ranges with plastic sheeting. Get the emergency plastic from the disaster materials storage area (5th floor – storage room by kitchen or emergency supply cabinet near staff elevators on the 3rd floor) and cover any materials, equipment, etc. that might get damaged.
  • Place plastic buckets or waste baskets under leaks.  Trash cans may be used to collect water.
  • Coordinate with Facilities Management to reduce temperature and relative humidity and increase air circulation to reduce the chance of mold.  Use portable fans to increase air circulations.  Monitor temperature and humidity throughout the recovery process.  Conditions are normal when temperature is 72 degrees F and relative humidity is 40-50%.  Higher levels may cause mold.
  • Contact specially trained recovery experts at BMS Catastrophe (1-800-433-2940, or 210-542-4180-cell).
  • If the recovery experts cannot help due to widespread disaster, follow the directions for recovering wet books and records in Appendix 4 and Appendix 5.

Hazardous Materials Spills/Incidents
UT Health Science Center has a pre-arranged contract with Eagle Environmental, 1-800-336-0909. Contact the Library Administration Chain of Command, who will determine whether to activate the Library Disaster Team. Also contact Facilities Management immediately.

Hurricanes, Tropical Storms and Tornadoes

Hurricane season for the Gulf Coast is generally from June through November, although hurricanes may develop at any time. During a violent storm, UT Health Science Center will be responsible for protecting any building, structure or equipment owned by the Health Science Center.  UT Health Science Center will maintain parking operations until weather conditions indicate the need to temporarily close the parking garages and lots.  Parking operations and campus streets will be opened as soon as weather conditions allow for the inspection of structures and the clearing of debris from the streets.

In the event of an imminent hurricane threat, notification will be provided through HSC Alerts, on the UT Health Science Center website at http://www.uthscsa.edu/status.asp, or by calling 210-567-SNOW. Local news and radio stations will provide current status updates.

The Texas Division of Emergency Preparedness website at http://www.txdps.state.tx.us/dem for information on evacuations, road conditions, and shelters.  Click the Emergency Operations link on the left then select State Operations Center (SOC) Situation Reports and look for the link to the hurricane.

Hurricane/Tropical Storm/Tornado Warning (San Antonio):

  • Look out for HSC Alerts and stay tuned to WOAI (1200 AM) for information
  • Only UT Police, the Fire Chief, or Environmental Health & Safety officers are authorized to advise when it is safe to evacuate the campus
  • Turn off all electronic equipment, especially computers
  • Follow departmental evacuation procedures in Appendix 6. If a tornado is imminent, instruct building occupants to evacuate to the 2nd floor classrooms of the Briscoe Library or other windowless rooms, crouch down and place arms over heads for protection.
  • Try to secure the items on the List of Most Rare and Valuable Books (not available to the public) if not already on hand.
  • Do not use the elevators
  • Stay away from windows and doors
  • Use flashlights, not candles or kerosene lamps, as a source of light

Staff should:

  • Lock the Library and leave
  • Tell someone outside of the storm area where you are going
  • Avoid flooded roads and watch for washed-out bridges.

After a Hurricane, Tropical Storm or Tornado has passed:

  • Return to the Library only after UT Health Science Center authorities (HSC Alert or 210-567-SNOW) or Library Administration advise that it is safe to do so
  • If power, telephones and/or water are shut off, the Library will follow the Policies for Emergency Closure. Facilities Management will be responsible for restoring electricity and water services. Systems and Network Operations (SNO) will be responsible for restoring phone and network connections
  • Staff from Library Technology, working with Computing Resources and SNO, will be responsible for restoring computer servers and networks
  • Take pictures of the damage for insurance claims and the Library’s archives
  • Use telephones only for emergency calls

Library Administration will determine whether to activate the Library Disaster Team

Mail Handling

Identifying Suspicious Packages and Envelopes

Some characteristics of suspicious packages and envelopes include the following:

  • Inappropriate or unusual labeling
  • Excessive postage
  • Handwritten or poorly typed addresses
  • Misspellings of common words
  • Strange return address or no return address
  • Incorrect titles or title without a name
  • Not addressed to a specific person
  • Marked with restrictions, such as “Personal,” “Confidential,” or “Do not x-ray”
  • Marked with any threatening language
  • Postmarked from a city or state that does not match the return address
  • Appearance
  • Powdery substance felt through or appearing on the package or envelope
  • Oily stains, discolorations, or odor
  • Lopsided or uneven envelope
  • Excessive packaging material such as masking tape, string, etc.

Other suspicious signs

  • Excessive weight
  • Ticking sound
  • Protruding wires or aluminum foil

If a package or envelope appears suspicious, DO NOT OPEN.  Contact Library Administration before proceeding to do anything.

Handling of Suspicious Packages or Envelopes

  • Do not shake or empty the contents of any suspicious package or envelope
  • Do not carry the package or envelope, show it to others or allow others to examine it
  • Notify a supervisor who will then decide whether to contact the Library Administration and UT Police.
  • Alert others in the area about the suspicious package or envelope
  • Leave the area, close any doors, and take actions to prevent others from entering the area
  • WASH hands with soap and water to prevent spreading potentially infectious material to face or skin

 

Pandemic

In the event of a pandemic, as determined by either government or university officials, notification will be provided through HSC Alerts, on the UT Health Science Center website at http://www.uthscsa.edu/status.asp, or by calling 210-567-SNOW.

For lesser pandemic levels, the library should institute the following measures to decrease the likelihood of the spread of disease:

  • Look out for HSC Alerts or call 210-567-SNOW to find out existing conditions at UT Health Science Center. Local news stations will also provide current status information.
  • Library staff will notify the public of any closures and status of the library through Web site updates, phone messages, social media and signs.  The library will consult with university administration regarding campus status throughout the pandemic.
  • CDC travel restrictions and recommendations will be followed by all staff
  • Staff who are sick will stay home in voluntary isolation. Library staff will follow university guidelines for use of sick leave.
  • Staff with sick family members will also stay home in voluntary quarantine.  Library staff will follow university guidelines for use of sick leave.
  • Staff should wear masks and gloves to prevent the spread of germs if recommended by the CDC.  Hand shaking should be discouraged and cough etiquette encouraged.
  • Hand sanitation supplies will be provided to public users of keyboards and discarded afterwards
  • Staff will stay isolated from each other as much as possible.  Staggered shifts and/or telecommuting will be encouraged.
  • If pandemic worsens, only designated essential employees will come to work.  Generally, library personnel are not considered essential employees, however, depending on the severity of the pandemic and directions from campus administration, some library personnel may be asked to report to work.

Power Failure

Call University Police at 911 or 210-567-2800

Library Evacuation Team members should check the building for people stuck in an elevator or in an un-lit area, in case the emergency lighting system fails.  At least one staff member should be positioned near the Library entrance to ensure security of library materials.

If after business hours, the Executive Director of Libraries or the Director of Briscoe Library and Outreach Services should be contacted.

Follow Policies for Emergency Closure.

Restraining Orders

UT Police should be notified of any restraining orders, at the discretion of the staff member involved.  Library Administration and Circulation staff should also be notified.

Stalking or obscene or sexually harassing emails should be forwarded to UT Police.  If the offense involves UT Health Science Center staff, Bonnie Blankmeyer, Institutional Employees Adviser should also be notified.

Telephone Service Disruption

  • An email should be sent to SNO: tn-customerservice@uthscsa.edu
  • If after business hours, use a cell phone to call University Police at 567-2800
  • The library will not close as long as there is access to a mobile phone to call UT Police

Terrorism and Bioterrorism

Terrorists look for visible targets where they can avoid detection before or after an attack such as international airports, large cities, major international events, resorts, and high-profile landmarks.  In the case of terrorist activity, staff should do the following:

  • Be familiar with Emergency Evacuation Procedures
  • Know where fire exits are located
  • Know where fire extinguishers are located, and how to use them
  • Keep the disaster and first aid supplies in a designated place in the library.

 

Theft

Report any theft of materials or equipment to the University Police at 567-2800 and notify library administration.

What to do if you are a victim of a crime on campus:

  • Contact University Police immediately. Inform the Police Communications Officer (PCO) of the description and direction of travel taken by the criminal, if known.
  • Remember all you can about the criminal and relay that information to the PCO, such as: race/sex, clothing description, height/weight, color of hair/eyes, any unusual features or jewelry and description of the vehicle.
  • Do not confer with other individuals who may have been involved in the incident or allow anyone in or near the area where the incident took place.
  • Reporting in some incidents may be confidential.
  • Notify Library Administration of any incidents.

Vandalism

If a report of vandalism is received, go to the scene of the incident and assess the situation.  Contact UT Police, Library Administration and the Disaster Team Leader and describe the damage.  Also contact Environmental Health & Safety officers if there is a perceived danger or health risk. Close off the area.  If the incident is reported by a witness, be sure the witness(es) remain to provide a statement.

As soon as possible after the incident, the Disaster Team Leader will work with Library Administration on the following:

  • If there is damage to walls, floors, electrical or data connections, or other parts of the building, send a work request to Facilities Management for a cost estimate to repair damages or clean up the area.  Include in the description, that the estimate is needed for a police investigation.
  • If there is damage or destruction to property, including furniture or equipment, work with Library Administration to determine the purchase price or request a vendor estimate for the replacement cost.
  • Forward cost estimates to UT Police.  This information will be used in investigation and/or prosecution of the case.
  • If the vandalism was caused by a UT Health Science Center student, the Vice President for Academic Affairs, the Director of Student Services, and the Associate Dean for Students of the appropriate school will be notified.
  • Follow up with UT Police to determine when we can proceed with repairs and when the area can be opened up for use, if it was sealed.

Water shut down

If a planned water shut down is to occur, Facilities Management will notify the Library Administration.  Library staff will be notified and Access Services staff will post “Closed” signs at restrooms on all floors of the building.  If the shut down is for more than 6 hours, the Executive Director of Libraries will determine whether the library should be closed. The determination will be based upon the location of the nearest working restrooms.

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Procedures for Non-Emergency Safety or Security Situations

 

Security and safety concerns should be reported immediately to the Access Services Supervisor on duty.  Depending on the circumstances, Access Services staff may call the Head of Access Services and ILL or the Director of Briscoe Library and Outreach Services. If the situation warrants it, University Police should be called at 911 or 210-567-2800.

If a problem occurs on weekends or after 5 p.m., contact the Library Administration Chain of CommandStaff Emergency Contact Information is on the Staff Intranet (not publicly available).

 

Unattended children

Children under the age of 15 must be accompanied by a supervising adult at all times. Unattended children under the age of 15 should be reported to the Access Services Supervisor on duty.  The child should be asked to contact his/her parent or guardian.  If the supervising adult is not in the Library, University Police should be contacted.  This policy protects the child from possible harm.

 

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