Staying Well Connecteds

Staying Well. Connected.

Student Olivia Hart Inspires Exercise Desks at Briscoe Library

Olivia Hart
MD Candidate 2021
UT Health San Antonio Long School of Medicine

Based on her experience at the Health Sciences Library at the University of Colorado, Olivia Hart first proposed the idea of exercise desks to the UT Health Briscoe Library in the fall of 2017. With Olivia’s recommendations, the library identified some highly rated bike and treadmill options to consider. Olivia proposed the options to fellow Class of 2021 students in a poll to see which would prove the most popular. Based on the results of the poll and other feedback from library surveys, one treadmill desk and three exercise bikes were purchased by the Library.

By the spring of 2018, space was cleared in a light-filled area on the Library 5th floor that offers great views of the campus. The exercise equipment is available to everyone in the UT Health community 24/7/365.

Thank you to Olivia and all of the students who participated in this project!

 

Thank You to Library Exam-Time Refreshment Sponsors!

 

While students are hard at work in the Library studying for exams, a number of generous sponsors have been providing refreshments on some evenings. The refreshments give students a chance to take a short break in the Library to re-energize and socialize before getting back to an evening of study.

Monday, April 30th: School of Nursing

Tuesday, May 1st: Student Life

Wednesday, May 2nd: School of Health Professions

Wednesday, May 9th: Graduate Student Association

The Library hopes to continue exam-time refreshments each semester. If you or your school, department or committee are interested in providing a sponsorship, please contact Peg Seger, 210-567-6398, segerp@uthscsa.edu.

 

Get Some Exercise at the Library!

Did you know that you can exercise and study at the same time?

Well, now you can, and you will have a great view of our beautiful campus!

Come to the 5th floor of the Briscoe Library to check out the new equipment.

There are 3 exercise bikes with attached desk-tops that can be used night or day, 24/7/365.

Standing power hubs are also available to charge your phone or laptop while you are exercising.

Stay tuned for a treadmill desk coming soon.

Technology Sandbox Coming Soon to the UT Health Briscoe Library

 

The Briscoe Library Technology Sandbox, an area with interactive work spaces and some of the newest technology to enhance medical education, is quickly coming together on the main floor of the library. Comfortable seating, desks, and a large worktable have been installed along with a 75 inch monitor now available for use. Soon, the space will feature a 3-D printer and computers for working with some of the latest 3-D visualization and virtual technology software. The technology will include an Oculus Rift virtual reality headset for students and faculty to interact with anatomy in two new, immersive ways: The Body VR and 3-D Organon VR Anatomy. The Body VR allows the user to travel through the bloodstream to discover how blood cells function and how organelles work together to fight viruses. The 3-D Organon VR Anatomy is described by Oculus as “the world’s first fully-featured virtual reality anatomy atlas.”

Also shown above is a newly installed exhibit in the Sandbox area entitled Transforming Anatomy: Then and Now. The exhibit features materials from the PI Nixon Medical Historical Library illustrating the timeline of the study of anatomy including the original works of Andreas Vesalius considered to be the father of modern anatomy. Come see how far we have come from the original anatomy masters to the latest in technology and software.

Watch for announcements regarding a launch event for the Technology Sandbox. Contact John Weed at WeedJ@uthscsa.edu for more information.

A Study on Coffee Drinking

A wonderful article has appeared on the Medical News Today website. Written by Catharine Paddock, PhD, it dives into some of the questions we all have had about the debate over the value, or hazards of coffee drinking. “There was a time when the only news about coffee and health was how it was bad for the heart, likely to give us ulcers and aggravate our nerves, but now it seems this popular beverage is receiving a more favorable kind of press.”

In the United States, we consume 1.3 metric tons per year, at a rate of 4.2 kg per person. The latest figures for 2012 suggest 65% of American adults drink coffee, placing the beverage “neck and neck with soft drinks”, says the National Coffee Association.

However, the researchers uncovering the good news are all saying the same thing: while there appear to be some health perks from drinking coffee, there are also a few cautions, and the evidence is not solid enough to actively encourage people to go out and drink coffee.

This article takes a good look at the shift in the research view on coffee consumption, touching on some of the key studies, and finishes off with some facts and figures about coffee and caffeine.

Copyright: Medical News Today

Drinking Coffee: More Good Than Harm?

Texas-Mexican Border Study finds pesticides a BIG problem.

HARLINGEN,TX— Air samples from homes of Hispanic mothers-to-be along the Texas-Mexico border contained multiple pesticides in a majority of the houses, according to a study conducted by the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio.
Several studies have reported that pesticide exposure may adversely affect mental and motor development of the infants during infancy and childhood. The new report is in the summer issue of the Texas Public Health Journal .

Click Here to read the entire story as it appears in the HSC News Publication, and what suggestions are being made to remedy the situation.  Story by Will Sansom and Sheila Hotchkin.

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