Staying Well Connecteds

Staying Well. Connected.

The UT Healthier Youth Recipe and Resource Booklet: A Successful Health Information Literacy Project

 

 

This summer, UT Health San Antonio Libraries, North East Independent School District (NEISD), the UT Teen Health Youth Leadership Council, and the UT Teen Health Clinic partnered to distribute UT Healthier Youth Recipe and Resource Booklets. This project was developed by librarian Karen Barton and funded with federal dollars through a National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM/SCR) Express Outreach Award. The booklets included nine healthy, kid-friendly recipes and pages listing online health information resources for kids and teens. A primary goal of the project was to increase awareness of NLM K-12 consumer health resources and promote healthy behaviors for youth in grades 3-12 who are at risk for poor health outcomes.  Another goal was to motivate youth to actually use the NLM K-12 health information resources and healthy recipes found in the booklet. From June 28-September 29, 2018, a total of 2,663 booklets were distributed directly to youth and to organizations that serve youth. There were over 750 more youth in more areas of the city reached than there were during the library’s NNLM/SCR-funded Youth Health Literacy Challenge project in 2017.

NEISD staff were instrumental in distributing 645 calendars to youth at four San Antonio Public Library (SAPL) branches during feeding times for their Summer Food Service Program. Additionally, 350 calendars were given to three other SAPL branches to distribute to youth. The UT Teen Health Clinic distributed 149 calendars and the UT Teen Health Youth Leadership Council, which consists of nearly 70 teens from across the city who promote sexual health to their peers, received training on health information resources and were given 432 booklets distribute—one each to keep for themselves and five each to distribute to peers. Overall, 19 organizations that serve youth participated in distributing the booklets and also included the YWCA, a middle school, high school, and afterschool and extracurricular programs.

Research by von Hippel, Powell, Downey, & Rowland (as cited in McLaughlin, 2012) shows that many American families lack access to healthy meals for their children during the summer and that children gain weight two to three times faster during summer months in comparison to the school year. Since 2016, NEISD has provided the Summer Feeding Program and chosen feeding sites based on the student family income at the neighboring school. In 2017, they served a total of 7,308 free meals for children and adults in San Antonio Public Library branches near schools that reported high numbers of low income students. Due to NEISD and Bexar County demographics and statistics, it is very likely that this project reached those most at risk for obesity, diabetes, and other diseases and conditions, and those most in need of health information and health literacy.

Project partners received great feedback that indicated that the project was making a difference in communities. A grandmother who is raising grandchildren told UT Health San Antonio Libraries staff that she was happy to have been given more recipe ideas through the booklet since, as she joked, it seems as though all her family eats is rice and beans. NEISD staff at Brookhollow Library reported that several parents who had received a booklet had tried some of the recipes. Nearly all of the 132 teens and parents reached through the UT Teen Health Youth Leadership Council Summit indicated on NNLM training session evaluation forms that their health information literacy was improved. Nearly all of them also expressed eagerness to use and tell others about the NLM resources. Additionally, Youth Leadership Council teens were surveyed regarding their outreach and reported that some of their family members and peers had tried the recipes or were happy to receive a booklet due to the content. One teen reported, “All of my friends thought that these booklets were cool and excited to receive them.” The majority of the YLC teens who responded to the survey reported that they had visited at least one health information website since their training at the summit and that they themselves had tried or planned to try a recipe found in the booklet.

For more information on this and other library outreach initiatives, feel free to contact Karen Barton at bartonkd@uthscsa.edu or Peg Seger at segerp@uthscsa.edu.

Student Olivia Hart Inspires Exercise Desks at Briscoe Library

Olivia Hart
MD Candidate 2021
UT Health San Antonio Long School of Medicine

Based on her experience at the Health Sciences Library at the University of Colorado, Olivia Hart first proposed the idea of exercise desks to the UT Health Briscoe Library in the fall of 2017. With Olivia’s recommendations, the library identified some highly rated bike and treadmill options to consider. Olivia proposed the options to fellow Class of 2021 students in a poll to see which would prove the most popular. Based on the results of the poll and other feedback from library surveys, one treadmill desk and three exercise bikes were purchased by the Library.

By the spring of 2018, space was cleared in a light-filled area on the Library 5th floor that offers great views of the campus. The exercise equipment is available to everyone in the UT Health community 24/7/365.

Thank you to Olivia and all of the students who participated in this project!

 

Thank You to Library Exam-Time Refreshment Sponsors!

 

While students are hard at work in the Library studying for exams, a number of generous sponsors have been providing refreshments on some evenings. The refreshments give students a chance to take a short break in the Library to re-energize and socialize before getting back to an evening of study.

Monday, April 30th: School of Nursing

Tuesday, May 1st: Student Life

Wednesday, May 2nd: School of Health Professions

Wednesday, May 9th: Graduate Student Association

The Library hopes to continue exam-time refreshments each semester. If you or your school, department or committee are interested in providing a sponsorship, please contact Peg Seger, 210-567-6398, segerp@uthscsa.edu.

 

Get Some Exercise at the Library!

Did you know that you can exercise and study at the same time?

Well, now you can, and you will have a great view of our beautiful campus!

Come to the 5th floor of the Briscoe Library to check out the new equipment.

There are 3 exercise bikes with attached desk-tops that can be used night or day, 24/7/365.

Standing power hubs are also available to charge your phone or laptop while you are exercising.

Stay tuned for a treadmill desk coming soon.

Technology Sandbox Coming Soon to the UT Health Briscoe Library

 

The Briscoe Library Technology Sandbox, an area with interactive work spaces and some of the newest technology to enhance medical education, is quickly coming together on the main floor of the library. Comfortable seating, desks, and a large worktable have been installed along with a 75 inch monitor now available for use. Soon, the space will feature a 3-D printer and computers for working with some of the latest 3-D visualization and virtual technology software. The technology will include an Oculus Rift virtual reality headset for students and faculty to interact with anatomy in two new, immersive ways: The Body VR and 3-D Organon VR Anatomy. The Body VR allows the user to travel through the bloodstream to discover how blood cells function and how organelles work together to fight viruses. The 3-D Organon VR Anatomy is described by Oculus as “the world’s first fully-featured virtual reality anatomy atlas.”

Also shown above is a newly installed exhibit in the Sandbox area entitled Transforming Anatomy: Then and Now. The exhibit features materials from the PI Nixon Medical Historical Library illustrating the timeline of the study of anatomy including the original works of Andreas Vesalius considered to be the father of modern anatomy. Come see how far we have come from the original anatomy masters to the latest in technology and software.

Watch for announcements regarding a launch event for the Technology Sandbox. Contact John Weed at WeedJ@uthscsa.edu for more information.

A Study on Coffee Drinking

A wonderful article has appeared on the Medical News Today website. Written by Catharine Paddock, PhD, it dives into some of the questions we all have had about the debate over the value, or hazards of coffee drinking. “There was a time when the only news about coffee and health was how it was bad for the heart, likely to give us ulcers and aggravate our nerves, but now it seems this popular beverage is receiving a more favorable kind of press.”

In the United States, we consume 1.3 metric tons per year, at a rate of 4.2 kg per person. The latest figures for 2012 suggest 65% of American adults drink coffee, placing the beverage “neck and neck with soft drinks”, says the National Coffee Association.

However, the researchers uncovering the good news are all saying the same thing: while there appear to be some health perks from drinking coffee, there are also a few cautions, and the evidence is not solid enough to actively encourage people to go out and drink coffee.

This article takes a good look at the shift in the research view on coffee consumption, touching on some of the key studies, and finishes off with some facts and figures about coffee and caffeine.

Copyright: Medical News Today

Drinking Coffee: More Good Than Harm?

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