Staying Well Connecteds

Staying Well. Connected.

CLHIN eNewsletter for July, 2012

CLHIN eNewsletter July, 2012

Briscoe Outreach Participates in 2012 Summer Institutes

Briscoe Library Information Table

Biescoe Library Information Table at the 2012 Summer Institutes

The Outreach Services Program of the Briscoe Library participated in the 2012 Summer Institutes on Evidence-Based Quality Improvement. The conference/exhibit was presented by The University of Texas Health Science Center at the Grand Hyatt Hotel, in downtown San Antonio, Texas. The entire program ran from July 17th - 21th and the Library Services Outreach was present on the 19th & 20th.

The Summer Institutes Program brought together over 500 clinicians, nurses, physicians, healthcare educators, leaders and researchers from across the nation and foreign countries as well. All were focused on a unified goal of sharing information concerning their own research and availability, while learning about other advancements in improving patient healthcare and patient safety.

The Briscoe Library Outreach Services used this opportunity to present information on PubMed, MedlinePlus, WISER and other National Library of Medicine online products which enable health professionals and consumers to access dependable and current information associated with quality patient care.

2011 National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) Progress Report Released

The 2011 National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) Progress Report was released at the XIX International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2012) taking place July 22-27, 2012, in Washington, D.C. Prepared by the Office of HIV/AIDS and Infectious Disease with input from HHS agencies and offices, the report highlights some of the Department’s key 2011 accomplishments.

Join the discussion on Twitter using #AIDS2012.

Briscoe Library Participates in the 2nd Annual San Antonio CHW/Promotor(a) Summit

Over 140 Community Health Workers (CHWs) attended the 2nd Annual San Antonio CHW/Promotor(a) Summit held on June 8th. Community Health Workers, also known as Promotores, are widely recognized as a vital part of the public health workforce in part by providing  health literacy training and patient navigation services to undeserved populations. Through the many roles played by CHWs, the health disparities that exist in many parts of our nation are more effectively addressed on a community level. Texas is only one of 2 states that currently offer certification programs for CHWs.

The UT Health Science Center Briscoe Library attended the summit to promote resources from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) that support public health workers and health consumers alike with trusted health and research information. Peg Seger, Head of Outreach Services, and Patrick Lemelle, Outreach Library Assistant, provided demonstrations on MedlinePlus and PubMed while distributing and answering questions on many other NLM products and services. Of particular interest were the NLM Mobile Apps and Sites.

Earlier in the year, the Briscoe Library had collaborated with the University Health System CareLink program on a video in which the partnership between the library and the University Health System CareLink program was featured with a focus on the CareLink Patient Education Initiative: Using MedlinePlus Videos to Reach the Underserved. The CareLink Patient Education Initiative depends heavily on student interns from the Northwest Vista College Community Health Program in San Antonio. The video was played for summit attendees during a presentation by Rafael Maldonado, CareLink Education Director. This and a new MedlinePlus exhibit banner created quite a bit of additional interest in the use of NLM resources such as MedlinePlus.

Briscoe Library Outreach Services Assistant Patrick Lemelle and new MedlinePlus exhibit banner

Some Key Texas CHW Facts:

In the state of Texas, 280 individuals graduated from a DSHS-certified community health worker certification training program of at least 160 hours in 2011. A total of 53 instructors were newly certified…As of December 31, 2011, there were 1,583 community health workers, an increase of 37% as compared to 1,153 community health workers at the end of 2010. The number of Texas counties with at least one certified community health worker grew from 82 counties at the end of 2010 to 101 counties as of December 31, 2011, an increase of 23%. In the UT Health Science Center Libraries outreach services area, Hidalgo County has 153, Bexar 106, Cameron 98, Webb 25, Starr 7, and Willacy 0. Bexar county along with Webb, Hidalgo and Cameron are all locations for Promotor(a)/Community Health Worker Training & Certification Programs.

Texas Department of State Health Services, Community Health Workers – Promotor(a) or Community Health Worker Training and Certification Program. 2011 Annual Report: Promotor(a) or Community Health Worker Training and Certification Advisory Committee. Available at: http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/mch/chw/workforce.aspx . Accessed 6/15/12

 

The CLHIN Program of the University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX, Briscoe Library Outreach

CLHIN (Circuit Librarian Health Information Network), a program provided by the University of Texas Health Science Center, Briscoe Library Outreach Program, provides accredited continuing education courses for nurses that provide participants with the skills they need to use current information technologies to obtain the latest news and research in the medical field.

We teach courses on health information resources that are approved for 1.0 CNE contact hour. Nursing contact hours have been approved through the Texas Nurses Association, an accredited approver of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

These are just a couple of the programs we offer through the outreach program of the Briscoe Library. For a comprehensive listing of CLHIN programs and contacts, visit CLHIN Services.

If you would like to set a date for any of our CE courses contact your institution’s CLHIN contact or email CLHIN@uthscsa.edu for more information.

 

2012 Texas Emergency Management Conference

Photograph of a San Antonio Fire Department fire truckThe University of Texas Health Science Center Briscoe Library participated in the 2012 Texas Emergency Management Conference in downtown San Antonio on April 2nd through the 4th. Sponsored by the Texas Division of Emergency Management, the conference brings together representatives of law enforcement, border and port security, transportation and cyber security, firefighters, emergency medical personnel, Texas Military Forces, voluntary organizations and private sector partners. Patrick Lemelle, Outreach Library Assistant, and Peg Seger, Head of Outreach Services, provided information and demonstrations on disaster information resources available from the National Library of Medicine (NLM).

One of the featured NLM programs demonstrated by the Briscoe Library representatives was the WISER program.  WISER  is an information system designed and maintained by the National Library of Medicine for first responders and all emergency personnel who need critical information at their fingertips.

WISER is a system designed to assist first responders in hazardous material incidents. WISER provides a wide range of information on hazardous substances, including substance identification support, physical characteristics, human health information, and containment and suppression advice.”

A free application is available for smart phones and other technical devices and can be acquired at the WISER website: http://wiser.nlm.nih.gov/

The conference became all too real this year when up to a dozen tornadoes hit the Dallas-Fort Worth area and emergency management operations were mobilized on the convention floor.

March is National Nutrition Month

We have a serious situation on our hands.
For the first time in the history of the world we are seeing great progress in the near complete eradication of hunger. While we have not solved the problem completely, it can be said that we are supplying food to at least most of the world. More of the poorer countries are learning agricultural techniques to insure a sustained food supply.

Why then, with such success, are we now facing a global epidemic of obesity?  Perhaps nutrition cannot be defined merely as fuel for the body, but it must also include adequate work and exercise for the body.  Nutritious foods can make us healthy, but food alone will not necessarily produce a total picture of health; we need also nutritious work and exercise to build good muscle, bone, blood and tissue.

Last year, a global study performed by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, (OECD),  on the health of the world in general, found that more than half a billion people, or one in 10 adults worldwide, were obese and that obesity was spilling over from the wealthy into poorer nations. It’s become an epidemic.

So, what can be done?

Most healthcare professionals agree that the most obvious and imminent causes for over-weight and obesity problems are consumption of excess calories, unhealthy eating habits and insufficient physical activity among children and adults. Individuals in the medical sciences, are being called upon to be leaders in opening the eyes of our communities to see the inherent dangers that threaten us all.

Below is a collection of articles aimed at studying and addressing our complete nutritional problem. You may want to share some of these articles and videos with your clients, patients, students and caregivers.  Together we can turn things around and help make lives better and healthier.

 

MedlinePlus: Obesity rates rise, threaten health in OECD nations:

US Department of Agriculture:

National Heart Lung and Blood Institute – For Health Professionals:

Texas Department of State Health Services:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

MedlinePlus:

MedlinePlus
Nutrition for Seniors:

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics:

 

Scholarly articles

OECD

Obesity in Latino Communities:

Obesity prevalence and the local food environment

Texas Health Institute, 2006 Report

MedlinePlus.gov:

Behavioral intervention program

Science Daily

Children and Nature Network

 

 

February 2012: National Children’s Dental Health Month

In 2002, the Urban Institute reported that one of the most prevalent chronic illnesses facing children in the United States today is tooth decay. It is astounding that oral health problems persist among children in spite the fact that tooth decay is largely preventable through regular dental cleanings and checkups. Still, 24 percent of children ages 5 to 17 account for 80 percent of the tooth decay disease in permanent teeth among this age group. Socioeconomic disparities are blamed for these oral health burdens and low-income children are disproportionately affected. Inadequate access to dental care can be cited as the problem. Please read the report: http://www.urban.org/publications/309527.html

It is with this problem in mind that the Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) offers Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) Dental Services though a managed care model. Beginning March 1, 2012, HHSC will expand managed care dental services to include Medicaid. The goal of this expansion is to provide quality, comprehensive dental services to eligible recipients. HHSC will select two or more dental contractors to provide services to both Medicaid and CHIP Members. Please read the report:
http://www.hhsc.state.tx.us/medicaid/MMC/TMHP_article_0611.pdf

It is good to remember also, that we can help protect our children’s teeth and diminish the growth of caries with various applications of dental sealants and with topical and systemic fluoride, but most importantly, a sound education and a good oral hygiene program will go a long way to help maintain healthy teeth and gums for a long, long time.

“Something Fun” from the American Dental Association in honor of National Children’s Dental Health Month:

http://www.ada.org/sections/publicResources/pdfs/2012NCDHM_ActivitySheets_English_FULL.pdf

Laredo 14th Annual Health Occupations Planning Exposition (HOPE)

UT Health Science Center Librarian Linda Levy talking to Laredo area students attending HOPE

Sponsored by the Area Health Education Center (AHEC) of the Mid Rio Grande Border Area of Texas

Students and teachers alike were very interested in a number of the features of
MedlinePlus and learning how NLM resources could be used for class projects. In
student health fairs, the MedlinePlus Videos & Cool Tools section often
gets the most immediate attention. We also handed out materials on ToxNet and
heard comments that some classes were working on projects with related topics and that this was a resource that they could use. We used the iPad exclusively at this fair and found that students were more apt to try their hand at looking up topics in MedlinePlus while also getting a chance to use the iPad.