Event Announcement

Friends of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library: Spring lecture series focuses on infectious disease discovery and epidemiology

U.S. Public Health Service Poster- Syphilis

U.S. Public Health Service poster: Images from the History of Medicine database, National Library of Medicine

The Friends of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library and the Briscoe Library launched a spring lecture series in February featuring Dr. Gregory Anstead of the School of Medicine speaking on the topic, Beyond Bugs and Drugs: Infectious Disease Discovery and Epidemiology.  The second installment in the series, focusing on Syphilis, will take place at noon on Thursday, March 24 in the Howe Conference Room, on the 5th floor of the Briscoe Library.

Dr. Anstead, whose interests include clinical trials of new antiretroviral and antifungal drugs and the historical epidemiology of infectious diseases, is director of the Immuno- suppression and Infectious Diseases clinics of the South Texas Veterans Healthcare System.

As always, the event is free and open to everyone.  Please bring your lunch and join us!

The series will continue in April and May with talks on Hantavirus (April 28) and HIV in America (May 26).

For more information about the spring lecture series, contact Pennie Borchers, Special Collections Librarian, at borchers@uthscsa.edu.

Hands-On Workshop from the Office of the Vice President for Research

The Power of Data Visualization for Expression and Genetic Analysis
Wednesday & Thursday, July 7 & 8

UT Health Science Center, San Antonio |Briscoe Library, Room LIB 2.011

The Office of the Vice President for Research is hosting two mornings of hands-on discovery focused on analysis of gene expression and genetic markers.  Application Scientist Jordan Hiller of SAS will be the instructor for both sessions. He will also be available for individual appointments in the afternoons to address specific questions about the analysis of  genomic data.

Gene expression, July 7, 9:00 a.m. to 12 p.m.: JMP Genomics 4.1 incorporates many tools valuable in gene expression analysis. Jordan Hiller will discuss capabilities for principal components analysis, hierarchical clustering, alternative splicing analysis for exon arrays and more. He also will provide a walk-through of the Basic Expression Workflow in JMP Genomics that provides a simplified path through standard quality control and statistical analysis of data sets.

Genetic marker analysis, July 8, 9:00 a.m. to 12 p.m.: Explore the unsurpassed breadth and depth of analytics for genetics data, as well as new genome visualization and predictive modeling. Jordan Hiller will show features for quality control, Q-K mixed models association analysis, and more. He also will demonstrate the Basic Genetics Workflow, which incorporates flexible filtering and analysis in a single, easy-to-use dialog.

Both workshops are offered free of charge.

Explore the agendas and register today.

For more information, contact Mike Wilson, Ph.D., Director of Institutional Research Core Facilities: wilsonma@uthscsa.edu

Harry Potter’s World: Exhibit opens this month

Stephen J. Greenberg, History of Medicine Division, National Library of Medicine

On July 21, 2007 author J.K. Rowling and her publishers released the last of her record-breaking novels featuring the young wizard Harry Potter.  Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows sold 15 million copies in the first twenty-four hours following its release.

Three days earlier, a group of middle-school visitors to the History of Medicine Division at the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, MD were shown an early 17th century treatise with an intriguing connection to J.K. Rowling and her tales. The visitors were fascinated and wanted to know more, so the staff of the History of Medicine Division began combing the collection in search of other historical materials that are conceptually linked to the fictional world created in Rowling’s stories.  This labor eventually produced a lecture series, two Web exhibits, and a traveling exhibit that has been coordinated by the American Library Association.

Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance Science, Magic and Medicine, produced by the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland and coordinated by the American Library Association, will open in the Briscoe Library on October 11.

A complete schedule of events can be found on our website.

C. Mackenzie Brown, Ph.D., Jennie Farris Railey King Professor in Religion at Trinity University, will speak at the exhibit’s opening event on the topic “Renaissance Science and the Quest for Immortality: Lessons from Albus Dumbledore, Nicolas Flamel and Isaac Newton.”  The opening  will take place in the Howe Conference Room, 5th Floor of the Briscoe Library from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

Annual Meeting of The Friends of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library —  November 1

Stephen J. Greenberg, Ph.D., Coordinator of Public Services for the History of Medicine Division, National Library of Medicine, will tell the story of the Harry Potter exhibit and how it took shape at the National Library of Medicine as the speaker at this year’s meeting of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Society.  The dinner takes place November 1, 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. at the Doubletree Hotel, 37 NE Loop 410 at McCullough.

We invite  Friends, their guests, and all those interested in the history of medicine to a terrific presentation.

Friends of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library
40th Annual Meeting: Dinner and Presentation

“Magic & Monsters in the Stacks: How Harry Potter Came to NLM”
Monday, November 1, 2010 – Doubletree Hotel – 37 NE Loop 410 at McCullough
Cash bar:  6:30 p.m.     Dinner:  7:00 p.m.
RSVP by October 27th to Pennie Borchers: Borchers@uthscsa.edu

Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance Science, Magic, and Medicine: Calendar of Events

Illustration of an alchemy workshop, courtesy National Library of Medicine

Opening Reception and Presentation

Monday, October 11, 2010 – 5:00 – 7:00 p.m.,
Howe Conference Room

C. Mackenzie Brown, Ph.D.
Jennie Farris Railey King Professor in Religion, Department of Religion, Trinity University

“Renaissance Science and the Quest for Immortality: Lessons from Albus Dumbledore, Nicolas Flamel, and Isaac Newton

What do Sir Isaac Newton, Albus Dumbledore, and Professor Severus Snape have in common?  What is the difference between the Philosopher’s Stone, a Horcrux, and a Crucifix? What does J.K. Rowling share with the gospel writer Matthew?  Dr. C. Mackenzie Brown will answer these questions in exploring the relation of religion and natural philosophy in the Renaissance and Enlightenment, and their role in the development of modern science.

Friends Lunchtime Presentation

Tuesday, October 19, 2010 – 12:00 noon – 1:00 p.m.
Pestana Lecture Hall

Charleen M. Moore, Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Cellular & Structural Biology, UT Health Science Center

“Potent Potions and Healing Herbs: Medicinal Practices of the Renaissance”

Would you like to have a recipe for a “good vomit” or learn how to make an effective theriac?  Do you know why Professor Sprout wore earmuffs or how to diagnose melancholy from a urine sample? You will find the answers to these questions in the talk by Dr. Charleen Moore on the medicinal practices of the Renaissance. She will also discuss the humeral basis of disease and describe two of the oldest medicinal botanical gardens in the world at Padua and Oxford.

Saturday Event for Young Readers

Saturday, October 23, 2010 – 10:00 – 11:30 a.m.
Howe Conference Room

Patricia Thompson, Ph.D.
Senior Lecturer in History, University of Texas at San Antonio

“A Little Muggle Magic: The Wisdom of Harry Potter for Families”

Having read the entire Potter series eight times over  and gathered insights from a large brood of grandsons, Dr. Thompson is eminently qualified to reflect on the most interesting customs of both the muggle and the magical worlds.

For Students Attending Science Expo

Saturday, November 6, 2010 – 2:00 and 3:00 p.m.
Howe Conference Room

Richard F. Ludueña, Ph.D.
Distinguished Teaching Professor, Department of Biochemistry, UT Health Science Center

“Living Dangerously: Doctors Adrift in the Dark Ages”

In the Middle Ages, there were a few good doctors and lots of bad ones, operating in a context of  ignorance.  The practice of medicine was very dangerous for patients—and even for doctors– who met various unpleasant ends when their medicine failed, as it often did.

History of Medicine lecture series continues with HIV-AIDS

  • Thursday, May 26, noon to 1 p.m.
  • Howe Conference Room

In the fall of 1980, Dr. Michael Gottlieb of UCLA Medical Center received a referral on a gay, white male in failing health with wasting, Pneumocystis pneumonia, and oral candidiasis.  Over the next few months, he and other colleagues observed the syndrome in four other patients, and described the new entity of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in 1981.  In 1984, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) responsible for this syndrome was discovered.

Infection with the HIV virus was found to predispose persons to opportunistic infections and cancers.  Epidemiologic investigations revealed the disease was transmitted sexually, by blood products, IV drug use, and from mother-to-child. Cases of AIDS exploded throughout the world in 1980s and 1990s. Millions upon millions have suffered and died. Efforts to control the disease have been hampered by prejudice against infected persons.  AIDS has become one of the greatest public health challenges in modern medicine.  Currently, about 33 million people are infected across the globe.    Efforts to develop vaccines against HIV have failed.  Nevertheless, in the last 15 years, combination antiretroviral therapy has transformed the treatment of HIV infection, converting a deadly disease into a chronic, manageable condition.  Analysis of the history of the HIV epidemic in the United States reveals the power of these drugs and also the deficiencies of drug therapy to combat this disease.

Dr. Gregory M. Anstead
Director, Immunosuppression and Infectious Diseases Clinics
South Texas Veterans Health Care System

History of medicine lecture series continues: Beyond Bugs and Drugs: Infectious Disease Discovery and Epidemiology

Navajo Painting

The deer mouse, an important carrier of hantavirus disease, depicted in Navajo art. Photo by permission, Ben Muneta, M.D.

Hantavirus

Thursday, April 28, 12:00 noon to 1:00 p.m.

Howe Conference Room, Briscoe Library

In May of 1993, members of the Navajo Nation in the Fours Corners area of the United States were stricken by a deadly pneumonia of unknown cause.  In less than two months, investigators from the CDC determined the infection was due to a new virus related to the Hantaan virus of Asia.  The infection was spread to humans by exposure to rodent excreta. 

The Four Corners area had a population explosion of rodents in 1993 due to an El Nino climate event, which caused an abnormally high level of precipitation.  Subsequently, it was discovered that many other species of Hantaviruses were lurking in the rodents of the New World. 

The spring lecture series, Beyond Bugs and Drugs: Infectious Disease Discovery and Epidemiology, sponsored by the Friends of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library and the Briscoe Library, continues on April 28.  In the third talk of the series Dr. Gregory Anstead of the School of Medicine, director of the Immunosuppression and Infectious Diseases clinics of the South Texas Veterans Healthcare System, will explore the rapid discovery of the etiology and reservoir ecology of Hantavirus as evidence of the power of epidemiology and molecular diagnostics. 

As always, the event is free and open to everyone.  Please bring your lunch and join us!

For more information about the spring lecture series, contact Pennie Borchers, Special Collections Librarian, at borchers@uthscsa.edu.

History of Medicine noon lecture will explore the treatment of diabetic pregnancy in the early 20th century

pregnancy“We Named Her Priscilla: Diabetic Pregnancy in early 20th century and Dr. Priscilla White”

Thursday, November 14, 12:00 noon
Howe Conference Room
5th floor, Briscoe Library

Kirsten Gardner, Ph.D., will talk about Priscilla White, a 1923 graduate of Tufts University Medical School whose groundbreaking work contributed to deeper understanding of diabetes, including diabetes in pregnancy.

Dr. Gardner, an Associate Professor of History at UTSA, is a past president of the Friends of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library.  Her research interests include women’s health, particularly the history of female cancers. Recent articles include “Hiding the Scars: A History of Post-Mastectomy Prostheses,” “From Cotton to Silicone: A History of Breast Prosthesis Since World War II”, and “Informing Women: Early Cancer Detection Skills.”

History of Medicine noon lectures, hosted by the Friends of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library, provide opportunities for informal learning and conversation. Everyone is invited. Please feel free to bring your lunch.

Susan Hunnicutt, Special Projects Librarian

History of Medicine presentation for March: Malaria in Central America

Panama CanalMarch 27, 6:00 pm

Howe Conference Room

5th floor, Briscoe Library

Eva Galvan, MSII and Member-at-Large for the Friends of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library, will be the presenter at the March meeting of the History of Medicine Society.  Eva will speak about  The Impact of Mosquito Control on the Building of the Panama Canal.  Everyone is invited.

The History of Medicine Society is an interest group of the Friends of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library.  Membership in the Friends is open to students, faculty and staff of the UT Health Science Center as well as members of the broader community.  For information about membership, contact Susan Hunnicutt, Special Projects Librarian, at 567-2406 or hunnicutt@uthscsa.edu.

History of Medicine Society will hold organizational meeting October 3

Illustration of a fly’s eye from Robert Hooke’s Micrographia (1665), collection of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library. The Micrographia is one of the books that will be featured in Dr. Charleen Moore’s presentation on some of the treasures of the Nixon library.

A new organization is being formed at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. The History of Medicine Society will provide a relaxed, interactive setting, with opportunities to discuss interesting stories of our predecessors as enrichment to our scientific and medical endeavors.  Membership will be open to students, faculty, and staff from all schools at UT Health Science Center, as well as from local undergraduate institutions.

Everyone is invited to learn more at the group’s introductory meeting, which will be held October 3, 2012 at 6:00 pm in the Howe Conference Room, 5th floor, Briscoe Library next to the Special Collections Reading Room.

For the group’s first program, Dr. Charleen Moore from the Department of Cellular and Structural Biology will speak about some of the rare book treasures of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library.  Among the books she will discuss that will be on display following her presentation are:

Oldest book in the Nixon library

1481 Celsus, De Medicina, Roman medicine

Anatomy

1543 A. Vesalius, De Fabrica

1597 (1924 facsimile) Ketham, The fasciculus medicinae

1749 B. Albinus, Tables of Skeleton and Muscles

Natural History

1859 C. Darwin On the Origin of Species (1st edition)

Dentistry

1778 J. Hunter, Natural History of Human Teeth

General Medicine

1582 Avicenna, Canon of Medicine

Microscopy

1667 R. Hooke, Micrographia

Obstetrics/Gynecology

1851 J. Hunter, The Gravid Uterus

Ophthalmology

1583 G. Bartisch, Ophthalmodouleia (1st edition)

Nursing

1859 F. Nightingale, Notes on Nursing (1st edition)

Surgery

1821 C. Bell, Illustrations of the Great Operations of Surgery

Psychiatry

1632 Burton Anatomy of Melancholy – oldest printed book in English

Botany/Pharmacology

1785 W. Withering, An Account of the Foxglove (1st edition)

Early San Antonio and Texas

1853 G. Cupples, Case Books (one of San Antonio’s early physicians)

1936 P.I. Nixon, A Century of Medicine in San Antonio

1946 P.I. Nixon, The Medical Story of Early Texas

Newest  Addition

1801, 1806, 1808 J. Bell, The Principles of Surgery (3 vol. 1st editions)

 

An RSVP will be appreciated. For more information or to RSVP, please contact one of the individuals below.

Suzanne Thibodeaux, MS-4, thibodeauxs@livemail.uthscsa.edu

Daniel Barron, GS-2, barrond@livemail.uthscsa.edu

Lindsey Jackson, MS-4, jacksonla@livemail.uthscsa.edu

Dr. Charleen Moore, Faculty Advisor, moorec@uthscsa.edu
 

History of Medicine Society will meet on December 3: Phil Valente, MD to speak

Dr. Phil Valente will speak on the topic, Virchow and Arias-Stella: Pathologist Pioneers and Social Activists, at the next meeting of the History of Medicine Society, Monday, December 3 at 6:30 p.m.  The meeting will be in the Howe Conference Room on the 5th floor of the Briscoe Library.  Refreshments will be served.

Looking ahead, Dr. Sanders Marble, Command Historian at the U.S. Army Office of Medical History, will speak on “Medical History and the Military: Opportunities and Difference,”  Thursday, January 24,  2013.

The History of Medicine Society has been organized by student members of the Friends of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library.  Membership is open to students, faculty and staff of the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, and to members of the wider community.

For more information about events of the History of Medicine Society, contact Susan Hunnicutt, Special Projects Librarian, at 567-2406, or by email (Hunnicutt@uthscsa.edu).