Exhibits

Shakespeare and the Four Humors: Exhibit opens Wednesday in the Briscoe Library

Sanguine

This image of the sanguine personality type was created by Henry Peacham in 1612. In Shakespeare’s day, sanguine personality was believed to be associated with the predominance of blood in relation to the three other bodily humors– yellow bile or choler, black bile or melancholer, and phlegm. Image courtesy of the Folger Shakespeare Library.

Dr. Mark Bayer, guest speaker

February 13, 6:00 p.m.

Howe Conference Room, Briscoe Library

William Shakespeare’s (1564–1616) characters are timeless, yet he described human personality in the language of his age.  The theory of  the four bodily humors—blood, yellow bile, black bile, and phlegm–  extends across Shakespeare‘s works, and is connected with the belief that emotional states have physical causes.  In Elizabethan England the four bodily humors were thought to engender the passions of anger, grief, hope, and fear— emotions that drive much of the action in Shakespeare‘s plays.

There’s the Humor of It: Shakespeare and the Four Humors is a  traveling exhibit produced by the National Library of Medicine/National Institutes of Health and the Folger Shakespeare Library to explore the inner logic of humoral theory as well as its connections to modern medical thought and practices.

The exhibit will open in the Briscoe Library at 6:00 p.m. on the evening of February 13 with a guest presentation by Dr. Mark Bayer, a member of the faculty in the Department of English at the University of Texas at San Antonio.  Dr. Bayer will speak on the topic, Why the Four Humours Make Sense: Shakespeare and the Four Humours.

The exhibit will remain on display through March 22.

In another event planned in conjunction with the exhibit,  Dr. Charleen Moore of the Department of Cellular and Structural Biology will speak on the topic,  A Balancing Act: Medical Practices and the Four Humors in the Renaissance. Her presentation will take place at noon on Wednesday, February 27th.

Both presentations are programs of the Friends of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library, and will take place in the Howe Conference Room on the 5th floor of the Briscoe Library.

 

The Many Faces of India – Exhibit for International Education Week on Display in November and December

Saffron TurbanThe Many Faces of India, photos by San Antonio photographer Deborah Keller-Rihn, opens in the Information Commons of the Briscoe Library on Wednesday, November 14.  The International Relations Committee will host a reception at noon in the Howe Conference Room of the Briscoe Library.  The exhibit, which has been planned in connection with International Education Week activities, will remain on display through the end of December.

Deborah Keller-Rihn has served as fine arts facilitator at Edgewood Independent School District, education curator at the San Antonio Museum of Art, program director at Bihl Haus Arts, arts program manager at Centro Cultural Aztlan, and as an independent curator and organizer for exhibits, cultural events, workshops and classes in the San Antonio area for over 25 years.  Currently, she teaches classes in photography, fine arts and the humanities at Northwest Vista College, and also maintains a studio in the Blue Star Arts Complex.

Keller-Rihn describes herself as a community oriented artist and teacher, and views art as a powerful tool for spiritual growth and social transformation.

World War I Poster Exhibit Opens in the Briscoe Library

A collection of ten World War I posters is now on display in the Briscoe Library. The collection, on loan from the San Antonio Public Library, features some very famous vintage posters dating back to 1917, such as Wake Up America, which depicts lady liberty personifying America asleep while the storm of war is brewing behind her, and “Uncle Sam’s” I Want You, considered the “most famous poster in the world”.

I-Want-YouThe display consists of lithographs depicting war propaganda that were commissioned by the U.S. government to inspire people to enlist. Posters were considered visually appealing, easily reproducible, and conveniently sized to paste on walls of buildings and windows of homes. The Division of Pictorial Publicity reached out to illustrators and encouraged them to volunteer their creativity to the war effort. The artists included James Montgomery Flagg, Charles Buckle Falls, Haskell Coffin, and others whose works also appeared on the cover of the Saturday Evening Post and other popular magazines. These posters are excellent examples of use of advertising strategies and graphic design of the period. They were designed to elicit a patriotic response, an urge to enlist, to pick up a flag, to support the men and women who participated as soldiers and nurses.

The collection will be on display in the library through the end of October.

Reference

The Washington Post. (2014, July 29). The posters that sold World War I. Retrieved from https://www.washingtonpost.com/posteverything/wp/2014/07/29/the-posters-that-sold-world-war-i/

Jonquil Feldman
Director, Briscoe Library and Outreach Services
feldman@uthscsa.edu

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