Exhibits

School of Nursing Historical Photographs On Display

Please come take a look at the latest library exhibit!

In honor of the recent National Nurses Week and the 2019 50th Anniversary of the UT Health School of Nursing (SON), a photography exhibit has been installed in the library. The exhibit features photographs from the archives of the Briscoe Library and the SON collection. Note: A number of the photographs discovered in the SON collection while preparing for the 50th Anniversary will become part of the library archival collection making them accessible to a wider audience.

With one exception, all of the photographs on display can generally be identified as circa 1970s and 1980s. Historical photographs often come to library archives unidentified which is the case with some of the photographs on display.  Challenge: However, one photograph is distinctly more recent than the others and we think viewers will be able to tell which it is.

For questions about the library archives, please contact Melissa DeThorne at 210-567-2470 or dethorne@uthscsa.edu.

 

 

Starletta: See the New Exhibit Coming to Briscoe Library

Miguel A. Vazquez, MD – Exploring the Intersection of Art and Medicine/Physician as Artist

“From a young age, I was inexplicably drawn (pun intended) to the sciences. This eventually led to a career in family medicine.  In this career, I have been fortunate to share our human experience by being with families when I would deliver a baby, and, at the other end of the spectrum, offering some comfort during the inevitable time of passing.”

Meet Starletta in October at Briscoe Library – A one of kind skeleton covered in 50,000 Swarovski crystals, created by Dr. Miguel Vazquez.

Student Photo Exhibit Comes to Briscoe Library

Bryant Huang, School of Medicine ’20, has created a photo exhibit that is now currently on display in Briscoe Library’s front entrance. The exhibit, entitled Still Life: Reflections on Hope and Illness, portrays patients from all walks of life with a unique collection of experiences and outlooks. Huang, along with his mentor Dr. Jason Morrow, created this exhibit to allow us to reflect on encounters with individuals who have changed our lives, to remind us to thank those who have helped us along the way, and to encourage us to take time to lend a hand to someone in need.

Each of the photographs in this exhibit is accompanied by a caption that illustrates patients’ hopes, values, and meanings. “These are the patients’ stories, their reflections on life and illness.”

The exhibit will be on display at Briscoe Library for the remainder of June.

Technology Sandbox Coming Soon to the UT Health Briscoe Library

 

The Briscoe Library Technology Sandbox, an area with interactive work spaces and some of the newest technology to enhance medical education, is quickly coming together on the main floor of the library. Comfortable seating, desks, and a large worktable have been installed along with a 75 inch monitor now available for use. Soon, the space will feature a 3-D printer and computers for working with some of the latest 3-D visualization and virtual technology software. The technology will include an Oculus Rift virtual reality headset for students and faculty to interact with anatomy in two new, immersive ways: The Body VR and 3-D Organon VR Anatomy. The Body VR allows the user to travel through the bloodstream to discover how blood cells function and how organelles work together to fight viruses. The 3-D Organon VR Anatomy is described by Oculus as “the world’s first fully-featured virtual reality anatomy atlas.”

Also shown above is a newly installed exhibit in the Sandbox area entitled Transforming Anatomy: Then and Now. The exhibit features materials from the PI Nixon Medical Historical Library illustrating the timeline of the study of anatomy including the original works of Andreas Vesalius considered to be the father of modern anatomy. Come see how far we have come from the original anatomy masters to the latest in technology and software.

Watch for announcements regarding a launch event for the Technology Sandbox. Contact John Weed at WeedJ@uthscsa.edu for more information.

The Art Wall is Under Construction

Work has begun on transforming the library entry wall into an art display space. Please excuse a little extra noise and mess as the wall continues to develop.

In the near future, the space will have its first exhibit comprised of entries to the first annual Image of Research Photography Competition.

For questions or exhibit requests, please contact Peg Seger at segerp@uthscsa.edu.

 

 

Where’s Starletta?

The star of the current Library art exhibit of local physician-artist Miguel Vazquez is his creation, Starletta. While Starletta is currently housed in the Library 5th floor Nixon Library Reading Room behind (sometimes locked) doors and within a glass case, she may be caught from time to time wandering the library floors.

As we understand, Starletta wants to get out and meet people and to learn more about what goes on in the library. We might even put her to work!

In order to make Starletta available to her fans, we have set up a schedule for her from October 8th to 31st from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. During these hours, you can come to the library to meet personally with Starletta and take pictures.

You will have to guess where she is!

World War I Poster Exhibit Opens in the Briscoe Library

A collection of ten World War I posters is now on display in the Briscoe Library. The collection, on loan from the San Antonio Public Library, features some very famous vintage posters dating back to 1917, such as Wake Up America, which depicts lady liberty personifying America asleep while the storm of war is brewing behind her, and “Uncle Sam’s” I Want You, considered the “most famous poster in the world”.

I-Want-YouThe display consists of lithographs depicting war propaganda that were commissioned by the U.S. government to inspire people to enlist. Posters were considered visually appealing, easily reproducible, and conveniently sized to paste on walls of buildings and windows of homes. The Division of Pictorial Publicity reached out to illustrators and encouraged them to volunteer their creativity to the war effort. The artists included James Montgomery Flagg, Charles Buckle Falls, Haskell Coffin, and others whose works also appeared on the cover of the Saturday Evening Post and other popular magazines. These posters are excellent examples of use of advertising strategies and graphic design of the period. They were designed to elicit a patriotic response, an urge to enlist, to pick up a flag, to support the men and women who participated as soldiers and nurses.

The collection will be on display in the library through the end of October.

Reference

The Washington Post. (2014, July 29). The posters that sold World War I. Retrieved from https://www.washingtonpost.com/posteverything/wp/2014/07/29/the-posters-that-sold-world-war-i/

Jonquil Feldman
Director, Briscoe Library and Outreach Services
feldman@uthscsa.edu