One Community/One Book

Announcing the One Community/One Book selection for 2013

Are You In?

Become part of One Community/One Book 2013

Howe Conference Room- Briscoe Library 5.076

Friday, November 30, 12:00 noon

Peer pressure can sometimes lead people to make unwise choices.  But it can also inspire courage and promote a more expansive vision of the world. According to Pulitzer Prize-winning author Tina Rosenberg , peer pressure draws its energy from the powerful human desire to be connected to others.  How peer pressure might be deployed in the service of better health is one question that will be considered during the UT Health Science Center’s fifth One Community/One Book program, which will feature Rosenberg’s book, Join the Club: How Peer Pressure Can Transform the World.

The Libraries and the Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics will host an event, Are You In?, on Friday, November 30 at noon to kick-off  One Community/One Book 2013.  The event is open to faculty, staff, students and members of the San Antonio health care community.  The first ten attendees to arrive  will receive a free copy of Join the Club.  Information will be available about the One Community/One Book workshop:   “How to Lead or Host a Book Discussion,” that will be offered twice, on January 23 and February 4, 2013.

The goal of the book give-away and the workshops is to encourage reading and conversation about what Rosenberg calls “the social cure.”  Book discussions will take place in February and March, leading up to Rosenberg’s appearance on campus on April 4, 2013, as the keynote speaker at the annual Community Service Learning Conference organized by the Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics.

Copies of Join the Club: How Peer Pressure Can Transform the World are available in the Briscoe Library, the Ramirez Library at the RAHC, and the library at the Laredo Regional Campus  (HM 831 R813j 2012) .  The book is also available at the UT Health Science Center Bookstore for $12.71, a 25% discount off the retail price.

One Community/One Book 2013 is made possible in part by a grant from Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.  For more information contact Susan Hunnicutt, Special Projects Librarian:  Hunnicutt@uthscsa.edu  or (210) 567-2406.

 

Announcing the One Community/One Book selection for Fall 2013

Louise Aronson

Louise Aronson

The Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics and The Libraries are pleased to announce that Louise Aronson, physician-writer, geriatrician and author of A History of the Present Illness, a collection of stories, has accepted an invitation to speak at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio on Thursday November 14, 2013, as part of a One Community/One Book project.

Dr. Aronson will be in town to give the keynote presentation and lead a workshop at the Annual Scientific Meeting of the Texas Chapter of the American College of Physicians.

Consider adding A History of the Present Illness to your summer reading list.

“This collection of short stories… take place in and around a San Francisco hospital. But the stories are less concerned with medical details than with the inner lives of the characters and the psychological toll that health issues take on caregivers, patients and their families.”

Kirkus Review

Copies of A History of the Present Illness are available in the Briscoe Library, at the Ramirez Library in Harlingen, and in the Laredo Campus Regional Library.  Click here to link to the full catalog record.

Copies will also be available in San Antonio at the UT Health Science Center Bookstore for $18, 25% off the retail price.

One Community/One Book is made possible in part with a grant from Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Susan Hunnicutt, Special Projects Librarian

 

Are you in? One Community/One Book training: February 4 at noon

Join the Club- Book CoverThis year The Libraries, in cooperation with the Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics, have chosen Join the Club: How Peer Pressure Can Transform the World for a One Community/One Book read.   Tina Rosenberg, the author of Join the Club, will be the keynote speaker at the CMH&E’s Community Service Learning Conference, which will take place on April 4, 2013.

The Libraries will offer three noon-hour workshops, January 28, February 4, and February 13, to support discussion group leaders and hosts. The workshops are open to faculty, staff, and students of the UT Health Science Center and members of the broader community who are interested in planning a discussion opportunity.

The workshops will be available on request in Harlingen and Laredo via V-tel.

Book discussions will be held throughout February and March, in the weeks leading up to Tina Rosenberg’s keynote address at the Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics Community Service Learning Conference on April 4, 2013.

Registration for Facilitator and Host Training Workshops

NOTE: You will receive a message confirming your registration.  Please email Susan Hunnicutt (Hunnicutt@uthscsa.edu) if you do not receive email confirmation within a week of registering.

January Training

Monday, January 28
12:00 noon – 1:00 pm
Collaboratory (Briscoe Library, San Antonio)

February Training

Monday, February 4
12:00 noon – 1:00 pm
Collaboratory (Briscoe Library, San Antonio)
Register Online

Wednesday, February 13
12:00 noon – 1:00 pm
Collaboratory (Briscoe Library, San Antonio)
Register Online

January Book Discussions

Wednesday, January 23

PrISM (Professional Interest in Social Media) Book Discussion
2:00 pm – 3:30 pm
Briscoe Library 2.039

 

Humnanities Texas Logo

One Community/One Book is a project of The Libraries and the Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics. This program was made possible in part with a grant from HumanitiesTexas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Barefoot Heart author speaks about migrant experience, education and achievement

Elva Trevino Hart

Elva Treviño Hart taught two journaling workshops at the Spring Conference of the Voelcker Biosciences Teacher Academy on Saturday, February 25.

An audience of more than 400 gathered on Friday, February 24 to attend a presentation by Elva Treviño Hart, author of Barefoot Heart: Stories of a Migrant Child.  The program was part of  One Community/One Book  2012, a project jointly planned by The Libraries and the San Antonio Public Library, with broad support from the UT Health Science Center community and funding from Humanities Texas.

More than 320 attended the program in the newly remodeled Holly Auditorium on February 24.  Audiences also watched via video conferencing from the Harlingen and Laredo campuses, from the Institute for Health Promotion Research, and via web link.

Treviño Hart reflected on changes that have taken place in the lives of migrant farm workers over the years:  She believes farm workers are more vulnerable today than in the 1950s because of increased use of toxic chemicals, and because a larger proportion of the migrant workforce is undocumented, and thus unable to press claims when they are treated unfairly.   She responded at length out of her personal experience to a question about folk remedies and healing practices of  Mexican American communities in South Texas.

Ms. Treviño Hart also read two passages from the recently-released book, Becoming Dr. Q: My Journey from Migrant Farm Worker to Brain Surgeon, by Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa.  One of the passages spoke about the continuing reality of racial prejudice that is experienced even by professional health care workers.  The other was about the beauty of the human brain, which transcends racial and ethnic differences.

Treviño Hart was in San Antonio from Tuesday, February 21 through Saturday, February 26 in connection with One Community/One Book 2012.  Tuesday evening she attended a book discussion hosted by Dr. Eileen Breslin, Dean of the School of Nursing.  She had lunch on Wednesday with the Committee for the Advancement of Women and Minorities, and later attended a book discussion hosted by Rajia Tobia, Executive Director of Libraries.  On Thursday morning Treviño Hart and Dr. Irene Chapa of the Office of Recruitment and Science Outreach met with 60 students, plus approximately 20 parents, at San Antonio Independent School District’s Young Women’s Leadership Academy; Treviño Hart spoke about the importance of setting personal goals and seeking out the help of others.  Later that evening, she spoke to an audience of 135 at the San Antonio Public Library Central Library.  On Saturday, Hart was the keynote speaker at the Spring Conference of the Voelcker Biosciences Teacher Academy.  She conducted two conference workshops on journaling that were attended by 50 teachers.

Altogether, more than 600 individuals have attended One Community/One Book events this year.  Additional discussion groups are scheduled later in March and early April.

Partners in One Community/One Book 2012 include the Academic Center for Excellence in Teaching; the Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics; the Office of Recruitment and Science Outreach; Michael Lichtenstein, M.D.; and Rajam Ramamurthy, M.D., all of the UT Health Science Center.  The program is also funded in part by Humanities Texas, the local affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Susan Hunnicutt, Special Projects Librarian

 

 

Barefoot Heart- Volunteer to lead a discussion group, and receive the book for free

Barefoot Heart- Book coverThanks to a community project grant award from Humanities Texas, The Libraries are once again able to provide books to individuals who volunteer to lead or host a discussion group in connection with the One Community/One Book program.

The first of several workshops for discussion group leaders and hosts will take place Monday, December 12, 2011 at noon in the Collaboratory of the Briscoe Library.  Online registration is available.  For more information contact Susan Hunnicutt, Special Projects Librarian, at hunnicutt@uthscsa.edu.

This program is made possible in part by a grant from Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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Barefoot Heart: Stories of a Migrant Child

Announcing the One Community/One Book 2012 selection

The UT Health Science Center Libraries’ popular One Community/One Book program will continue in 2012 with the theme of cultural diversity.  The book selected for reading and discussion is Barefoot Heart: Stories of a Migrant Child by Elva Trevino Hart.

In Barefoot Heart, the author chronicles her memories of growing up in a migrant farm worker family in Pearsall, Texas.  The book details her family’s struggle to make a living and to overcome prejudice and poverty through education.  The author’s spare yet elegant writing style makes for a moving read that encourages reflection on a number of themes including the importance of family and community, education as a way out of poverty, cultural diversity in our own South Texas communities, and the promotion of cultural competence and empathy as we train tomorrow’s health care professionals.

Plans for One Community/One Book include workshops for discussion group leaders, book discussion groups, and several speaking engagements for the author from February 23-25, 2012.  Tentatively, Ms. Hart will speak on campus Friday, February 24 at 12:00 noon.  Copies of the book will be available through the library soon, and the bookstore will be selling Barefoot Heart at a 25% discount, beginning in September.  A book signing will follow Ms. Hart’s talk on February 24.

One Community/One Book 2012 is a collaborative effort between The Libraries, the Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics, the Academic Center for Excellence in Teaching (ACET), and the San Antonio Public Library.

For information about One Community/One Book, contact Susan Hunnicutt, Special Projects Librarian:  Call 567-2406 or email Hunnicutt@uthscsa.edu.

Rajia Tobia
Executive Director of Libraries

Cancer Cell Research: The Way of All Flesh

BBC documentary chronicles the story of HeLa cells, features many individuals familiar to readers of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

The Briscoe Library has acquired a DVD copy of Cancer Cell Research: The Way of All Flesh.  The 1997 BBC documentary, which tells the story of the development of the first “immortal” human cell line, is mentioned frequently in Rebecca Skloot’s book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.  The documentary includes film footage of interviews with George Gey, Mary Kubicek, Leonard Hayflick, Roland Patillo, and many other researchers who worked with HeLa Cells during the 1950s, 60s and 70s, and also with Henrietta Lacks’ children, family members, and friends.

Purchase of the DVD came with a performance license which allows it to be shown in a variety of educational settings.  For information, contact Susan Hunnicutt, Special Projects Librarian, at Hunnicutt@uthscsa.edu.

Hear Elva Treviño Hart: Author to speak February 24

Photograph of Elva Trevino Hart

Elva Treviño Hart will speak in the Holly Auditorium at noon on Friday, February 24.

Elva Treviño Hart, author of Barefoot Heart: Stories of a Migrant Child, is the featured guest for this year’s One Community/One Book program.  She will speak Friday, February 24, 2012 at 12:00 noon in the Holly Auditorium on the campus of the UT Health Science Center in San Antonio.  The program will be followed by a book signing.

The program can also be viewed via videoconferencing in Harlingen (RAHC 2.120) and Laredo (AB 1.106).  Update (2/23): For those who can’t attend in person, the program will also be webcast live.  Tune in at http://bit.ly/ETH0224 at 12 noon CST on the day of the presentation.

“My whole childhood, I never had a bed,” Hart’s story begins. It traces her journey from rural South Texas and the beet farms of the Upper Midwest to the graceful campus of Stanford University and, eventually, corporate America.

The book vividly details the deprivation and discrimination faced by the Treviños, along with their joys, triumphs and everyday life. Hart went on to earn degrees in theoretical mathematics and computer science/engineering, which allowed her to make more money than she had ever dreamed possible. Still, she felt out of place, and she ultimately left the corporate world and used writing to bridge her past and present.

The importance of storytelling is a thread that is woven throughout Barefoot Heart.  As a young  child in the mid- 1950s, Hart would wait by the family car during the long hours that her parents and her five siblings worked in the beet fields of Minnesota and Wisconsin.  She would make up stories to pass the time.  Later in the evenings, the family would gather to listen and to tell stories.  In a world without toys, books or television, storytelling was both art and entertainment.

In Barefoot Heart, Hart gathers the stories of several lifetimes within one cover.  Each chapter begins with a dicho, or saying.  She says she organized her writing in this way to honor her father, who sometimes would make  up dichos on the spot, though he also knew many traditional Mexican folk sayings.  Each dicho carries the  same message of the chapter that follows.  “I wanted to take people with me to the migrant camps and the fields so they could see what it was like,” she told an interviewer last March, when Barefoot Heart was selected for a community read in Huntington Beach, California.

“I didn’t start out wanting to write a book,” she says.  Instead, she signed up for a “write your life story” class at a local YMCA.  One of her classmates loved Hart’s stories so much she shared them with her husband, a communications professor, who decided to feature them at an annual short story event he hosted.  At the end of the evening, the professor got a standing ovation, and people said they would like to buy the book. “That’s when I decided it might be a book,” she says.

Elva Trevino Hart’s February 24 presentation on the UT Health Science Center’s Long campus is part of One Community/One Book 2012.  Partners in this year’s program include the San Antonio Public Library– where Hart will speak on the evening of Thursday, February 23, the Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics, and the Academic Center for Excellence in Teaching.

The program is  made possible in part by a grant from Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

More information about One Community/One Book can be found on the project website: http://library.uthscsa.edu/2012/01/onebook/.

Download a printed flyer for One Community/ One Book, and help us spread the word:

http://library.uthscsa.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/ocob2012poster.pdf.

Susan Hunnicutt, Special Projects Librarian with Sheila Hotchkin, Media Communications Officer

Join the Club by Tina Rosenberg is the next common reading selection

Are You In?

Join the Club- Book CoverBecome part of One Community/One Book 2013

Peer pressure can sometimes lead people to make unwise choices.  But it can also inspire courage and promote a more expansive vision of the world. According to Pulitzer Prize-winning author Tina Rosenberg , peer pressure draws its energy from the powerful human desire to be connected to others.  How peer pressure might be deployed in the service of better health is one question that will be considered during the UT Health Science Center’s 5th One Community/One Book program, which will feature Rosenberg’s book, Join the Club: How Peer Pressure Can Transform the World.

Book discussions will take place in February and March 2013, leading up to Rosenberg’s appearance on campus on April 4, 2013, as the keynote speaker at the annual Community Service Learning Conference organized by the Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics.

The Libraries will offer the One Community/One Book workshop.  “How to Lead or Host a Book Discussion,” at noon on Thursday, January 24 and Monday, February 4, 2013.

Copies of Join the Club: How Peer Pressure Can Transform the World are available in the Briscoe Library, the Ramirez Library at the RAHC, and the library at the Laredo Regional Campus  (HM 831 R813j 2012) .  The book is also available at the UT Health Science Center Bookstore for $12.71 plus tax, a 25% discount off the retail price.

One Community/One Book 2013 is made possible in part by a grant from Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.  For more information contact Susan Hunnicutt, Special Projects Librarian:  Hunnicutt@uthscsa.edu  or (210) 567-2406.

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One Community One Book: Author Louise Aronson will speak on campus November 14

Louise Aronson

“These stories are about medicine exactly in the way that medicine is about life.” –A review of Louise Aronson’s A History of the Present Illness.

5:30 p.m. Author Presentation
6:30 p.m. Reception and Book Signing
UT Health Science Center Holly Auditorium

Louise Aronson, M.D., M.F.A., the author of A History of the Present Illness, this fall’s One Community/On Book selection, will speak in the Holly Auditorium Thursday, November 14, at 5:30 p.m.  The event is free and open to the public.

Louise Aronson is an Associate Professor of Geriatrics at the University of California at San Francisco. She directs the Northern California Geriatric Education Center and the UCSF Medical Humanities program. Dr. Aronson’s clinical practice is through the Housecalls Program where she provides care to homebound older adults in underserved San Francisco neighborhoods.

Her research and scholarship focus on geriatrics education, reflective learning, and public medical writing.

For more information about Aronson’s November 14th appearance, call the Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics at 210-567-0795.

This year’s One Community/One Book program is the 6th such partnership for The Libraries and the Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics. Previous book selections included Mountains Beyond Mountains: The Quest of Dr. Paul Farmer, A Man Who Would Cure the World (2008); Final Exam: A Surgeon’s Reflections on Mortality (2009); The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks (2010); Barefoot Heart: Stories of a Migrant Child (2012); and Join the Club: How Peer Pressure Can Transform the World (Spring 2013). Since 2008, more than 800 individuals have participated in One Community/One Book book discussions, and as many as 2800 individuals have attended author events.

One Community/One Book is made possible in part with a grant from Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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