News from the Libraries

News from the Libraries

Featured new books for August 2013

Doctor-of-Nursing-EssentialsThe doctor of nursing practice essentials : a new model for advanced practice nursing / edited by Mary E. Zaccagnini and Kathryn Waud White.
Burlington, Mass. : Jones & Bartlett Learning, c2014.
WY 18.5 D6373 2014. Click here to view the Full Catalog Record

biology-of-cancerThe biology of cancer / Robert A. Weinberg.
New York : Garland Science, c2014.
QZ 202 W423b 2014. Click here to view the Full Catalog Record

PestanaDr. Pestana’s surgery notes : top 180 vignettes for the surgical wards / Carlos Pestana.
New York : Kaplan, c2013.
WO 18.2 P476d 2013. Click here to view the Full Catalog Record

Interview-StrategiesThe medical school interview : winning strategies from admissions faculty / Samir P. Desai, Rajani Katta.
Houston, Tex. : MD2B, c2014.
W 19 D441m 2014. Click here to view the Full Catalog Record

Research-methods-in-OrthodonticsResearch methods in orthodontics : a guide to understanding orthodontic research / Theodore Eliades, editor ; foreword by T.M. Graber.
Heidelberg ; New York : Springer, c2013.
WU 400 R432 2013. Click here to view the Full Catalog Record

PsychiatricDiagnosisEssentials of psychiatric diagnosis : responding to the challenge of DSM -5 / Allen Frances.
New York : Guilford Press, c2013.
WM 141 F815e 2013. Click here to view the Full Catalog Record

For a complete list of new titles added in the month of August click here.

Purchase suggestions? Complete the online Purchase Suggestion Form or contact Andrea N. Schorr, Cataloging & Acquisitions Librarian at schorr@uthscsa.edu.

Libraries support Laredo science camp for aspiring health care professionals

Science Camp

Peg Seger, Head of Briscoe Library Outreach Services, taught health literacy and database search skills to students enrolled in Summer Science Camp.

Peg Seger, Head of Briscoe Library Outreach Services, provided two classes for the 25 students in the Summer Science Camp for aspiring health care professions held in Laredo July 15 – 26.  Students learned about health information literacy and reliable health information sites like MedlinePlus made available through the National Library of Medicine (NLM). Students also learned how to search for medical information with databases like PubMed.

The camp, sponsored by Laredo Doctors Hospital and hosted at the Regional Academic Center, was presented jointly with the Texas A&M International University (TAMIU).  The intensive two-week program was designed to enhance academic and professional preparation for traditional and non-traditional students and current working professionals  pursuing enrollment in a health profession school.

The curriculum for the camp was designed around an inter-professional framework that provided:
• Three core courses: Biology, Anatomy, and Physiology
• Discipline specific instruction time for Physician Assistant Studies, Physical Therapy, Respiratory Care, Emergency Medicine, Nursing, and Pre-Medicine
• Learning skills and test taking workshops
• Seminars featuring topics on health care professions
• Professionalism such as personal marketing, critical thinking skills, mock interviews, and group communication
• Networking and field trips

 

AAMC Tumblr site highlights the value of federally funded medical research

Research Means Hope on TumblrThe Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) recently announced a new social media resource, Research Means Hope, that highlights federally funded medical research advances being made by scientists and physicians at the nation’s medical schools and teaching hospitals. The site, which runs on Tumblr blogging software, also includes stories of patients who have benefited from advances in medical research.

Research Means Hope is intended to serve as a resource for legislators and staff, the media, patients, and anyone else who is interested in learning more about the medical research discoveries happening as a result of the nation’s sustained federal investment in medical research. Scientists and physicians at the nation’s medical schools and teaching hospitals conduct about half of all external research funded by the National Institutes of Health.

Searchable by state, disease category, institution, and funding source, Research Means Hope currently includes more than 280 posts highlighting medical innovations.  More content, including videos, photos, and text, is added by AAMC-member institutions on a daily basis.

Over time, the AAMC hopes it will serve as a central repository for news about medical research advances by medical schools and teaching hospitals.

Research Means Hope also maintains a presence on Facebook.

Adapted from an item on the website of  the AAMC Newsroom

Summer reading: Siddhartha Mukherjee to speak at Trinity University on August 28

The Emperor of All MaladiesSiddhartha Mukherjee, author of The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer, will speak at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, August 28 in Laurie Auditorium at Trinity University.  The event, part of Trinity’s Reading TUgether summer reading program, is free and open the public.

The Emperor of all Maladies was a 2010 National Book Critics Circle Award finalist, and the recipient of the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for General Nonfiction. In it Mukherjee reflects on his experiences as a hematology and oncology fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital, while at the same time constructing a history of cancer research and treatment.   The Pulitzer jury, in awarding the prize, called it “an elegant inquiry, at once clinical and personal”.

More information about the August 28 program at Trinity University can be found on the Trinity University website.

Susan Hunnicutt, Special Projects Librarian

 

 

About library classes

QRImage-LibClasses

Scan this code with your smartphone camera QR reader app to find library classes online.

The Libraries offer classes, consultations and other training to assist with the effective use of databases and research tools. All library classes are free and open to all. Register today to reserve your spot!

Schedule a Special Class
To schedule a special class or orientation for your department or group at other days/times, please contact the library at (210) 567-2450 or email AskaLibrarian@uthscsa.edu.

Integrating Library Research Skills into Blackboard and/or Academic Course Content
Faculty are encouraged to integrate library research skills into course content. Librarians are available to develop and teach classes that meet specific needs or are about a specific resource. To learn more or to schedule a class, contact Katie Prentice at prenticek@uthscsa.edu or call 210-567-6606.

To see the upcoming classes, visit the Attend a Library Class! page.

News from the Libraries — July 2013

Tomato

This illustration of a tomato plant is from A Curious Herbal, a popular book among physicians and apothecaries of 18th century London. A Curious Herbal is one of the books that is accessible through the National Library of Medicine’s Turning the Pages Online exhibit. Find out more in this issue of News from the Libraries

A History of the Present Illness, and other books you might enjoy reading this summer

How to Landscape to Your Environment: Program will share information about plants and landscaping on campus

Web of Science – Resource review for cancellation

IOM releases report on the CTSA Program at NIH

NIH Public Access Policy changes go into effect July 1

MS3s learn about medical smartphone applications and mobile databases for clinical support

Learning Express Library offers software tutorials and practice tests

Reach out and “Instant Message”

Finding aids: Tools for locating historical materials in the University Archives

About library classes

Turning the Pages Online: Website showcases beautiful images from rare medical books

See all past issues of News from the Libraries

How to Landscape to Your Environment: Program will share information about plants and landscaping on campus

Landscaping on the Long Campus

Photos on this page by Walter Creech

Mother-in-laws, Willows and Green Chile Stew:

How to Landscape to Your Environment

Friday, July 26, Noon to 1 p.m.

Howe Conference Room, 5th floor, Briscoe Library

Recently, President Henrich shared this comment and request that he received, about the landscaping of the Long Campus:

I have been with the Health Science Center for more than 22 years and I have always been very proud of the beauty of our campus…. I have tried adding many of the same selections to my own landscaping.  But it has been difficult to go to a nursery and get the same plant, even with pictures. I was thinking it would certainly promote xeriscaping if we could find out the names of the plants used around our campus… Just a thought to promote water conservation. Thank you for your time.

The Libraries and Facilities Management will host a program at noon on Friday, July 26, for anyone who shares an interest in  planting and maintaining beautiful, drought-tolerant landscapes like those on our campus. Dave Brahm, Manager of Landscape and Grounds for the UT Health Science Center, will discuss how to use a diverse palate of native plant material to create a colorful landscape that is durable and suited to our climate.

Brahm, who has been the grounds manager at the Health Science Center for 25 years, has a Masters of Science degree in Horticulture from Iowa State University and is a State of Texas licensed irrigator.

The program is open to everyone, and attendees are invited to bring their lunches.

Susan Hunnicutt, Special Projects Librarian

Landscaping on the Long CampusLandscaping on the Long CampusLandscaping on the Long Campus

A History of the Present Illness, and other books you might enjoy reading this summer

A History of the Present IllnessSummer is a great time to read for pleasure.  We hope you will be able to find a few hours to relax with the perfect book, and  we have some titles for your consideration:

Last month, The Libraries and the Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics announced the selection of the next One Community/One Book title.  It is A History of the Present Illness, by Louise Aronson, M.D., M.F.A.  We are excited about this book!  A History of the Present Illness is a first novel for Aronson, a geriatrician and member of the faculty at the University of California at San Francisco School of Medicine, who is also a graduate of the Woodrow Wilson School of Writing.

According to one reviewer the book is “an intelligent and pleasurable collection rich enough for re-reading, study, and discussion.  Aronson… combines extensive medical experience with her considerable storyteller’s gifts.” Literature, Medicine and the Arts Database

Copies of A History of the Present Illness are available in The Libraries (call number PS 3601.R67 A769h 2013) , and at the UT Health Science Center Bookstore for $18, 25% off the retail price.

One Community/One Book is made possible in part with a grant from Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

*****

When we asked members of the library staff to share their ideas for good summer reads, large expanses of water emerged as a  common theme.  Here are two cool blue books to consider:

The Ocean at the End of the LaneKelley Minars, Web Librarian in the Briscoe Library, enjoyed The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman: “This book is funny, scary, and bewitching in turns. The author takes his own childhood mythologies and weaves them into a moving story in this short but engaging read.”

 

 

 

The Cat's TableJonquil Feldman, Director of Briscoe Library and Outreach Services, recommends The Cat’s Table by Michael Ondaatje.  “The author of The English Patient speaks in the first person as he describes the story of an eleven-year-old boy in 1954, traveling on a 3-week voyage from Ceylon to England. The boy, Mynah, befriends two other boys and they run unsupervised all over the ship, going from one reckless adventure to the next. Their meals are eaten with a group of colorful adult characters at the “cat’s table”, located far from the Captain’s table. The book appealed to me because the boy is suspended for a few unfettered weeks between his orderly and safe childhood in Ceylon and the unknown challenges he will face when he begins a new life in England. I found this book to be thought provoking, poetic and also very entertaining.”

 

Good Omens: Gaiman and PratchettFinally, Rajia Tobia, Executive Director of Libraries, suggests Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch, by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman. “This book is probably more suited for a read around Halloween, so read it now and then again in October. Every time and no matter how many times I read Good Omens, it makes me laugh out loud, especially if you have been to England or are from England. It is about the end of the world which will end on Saturday, next Saturday to be exact, and how a fussy angel and a fast-living fallen angel sort of mess up the best laid plans for Armageddon.”

Web of Science – Resource review for cancellation

Librarians often need to make difficult decisions about resources to retain and those to cancel. There are rarely enough monetary resources available to accommodate rising costs of journals, books and databases. As we review renewal decisions for 2014, we are identifying those resources that may be duplicative.

Web of Science is a citation database that indexes scientific literature to 1900. The library currently subscribes to both Web of Science and Scopus. Although these databases are not identical they are similar in their scope; they both provide citation tracking and indexing of multidisciplinary resources, authors’ H-index, and journal ranking or impact factors. Scopus is currently the knowledge base for SciVal which provides research profiles for 400 Health Science Center researchers. Web of Science, Scopus, and SciVal are available for access through the library’s website, Databases section at http://www.library.uthscsa.edu.

Because it may not be financially feasible to continue both Web of Science and Scopus starting in 2014, we are considering cancellation of the current subscription to Web of Science. Please contact John Weed, Head of Collection Resources, weed@uthscsa.edu with your comments about this possible cancellation.

Rajia Tobia, Executive Director of Libraries

IOM releases report on the CTSA Program at NIH

iom_logoThe Institute of Medicine has released a report, The CTSA Program at NIH:  Opportunities for Advancing Clinical and Translational Research, evaluating the NIH’s Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) program.  The IOM committee finds that “the CTSA program is contributing significantly to advancing clinical and translational research.” The committee recommends “a number of revisions that could make the program more efficient and effective and could ensure future successes.” If enacted, “these changes would help establish the CTSA Program as the national leader for advancing innovative and transformative clinical and translational research.”

The recommendations include updating the program’s leadership structure, mission and goals.

A brief of the full report can be found on the website of the Institute of Medicine.

The pre-publication report, can be accessed through the library’s catalog.

The CTSA program is administered by the NIH’s National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS).