News from the Libraries

News from the Libraries

The UT Healthier Youth Recipe and Resource Booklet: A Successful Health Information Literacy Project

 

 

This summer, UT Health San Antonio Libraries, North East Independent School District (NEISD), the UT Teen Health Youth Leadership Council, and the UT Teen Health Clinic partnered to distribute UT Healthier Youth Recipe and Resource Booklets. This project was developed by librarian Karen Barton and funded with federal dollars through a National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM/SCR) Express Outreach Award. The booklets included nine healthy, kid-friendly recipes and pages listing online health information resources for kids and teens. A primary goal of the project was to increase awareness of NLM K-12 consumer health resources and promote healthy behaviors for youth in grades 3-12 who are at risk for poor health outcomes.  Another goal was to motivate youth to actually use the NLM K-12 health information resources and healthy recipes found in the booklet. From June 28-September 29, 2018, a total of 2,663 booklets were distributed directly to youth and to organizations that serve youth. There were over 750 more youth in more areas of the city reached than there were during the library’s NNLM/SCR-funded Youth Health Literacy Challenge project in 2017.

NEISD staff were instrumental in distributing 645 booklets to youth at four San Antonio Public Library (SAPL) branches during feeding times for their Summer Food Service Program. Additionally, 350 booklets were given to library staff at three other SAPL branches to distribute to youth. The UT Teen Health Clinic distributed 149 booklets and the UT Teen Health Youth Leadership Council, which consists of nearly 70 teens from across the city who promote sexual health to their peers, received training on online health information resources and were given 432 booklets to distribute—one each to keep for themselves and five each to distribute to peers. Overall, 19 organizations that serve youth participated in distributing the booklets and also included the YWCA, a middle school, high school, and afterschool and extracurricular programs.

Research by von Hippel, Powell, Downey, & Rowland (as cited in McLaughlin, 2012) shows that many American families lack access to healthy meals for their children during the summer and that children gain weight two to three times faster during summer months in comparison to the school year. Since 2016, NEISD has provided the Summer Feeding Program and chosen feeding sites based on the student family income at the neighboring school. In 2017, they served a total of 7,308 free meals for children and adults in San Antonio Public Library branches near schools that reported high numbers of low income students. Due to NEISD and Bexar County demographics and statistics, it is very likely that this project reached those most at risk for obesity, diabetes, and other diseases and conditions, and those most in need of health information and health literacy.

Project partners received great feedback that indicated that the project was making a difference in communities. A grandmother who is raising grandchildren told UT Health San Antonio Libraries staff that she was happy to have been given more recipe ideas through the booklet since, as she stated in jest, it seems as though all her family eats is rice and beans. NEISD staff at Brookhollow Library reported that several parents who had received a booklet had tried some of the recipes. There were 132 teens and parents or other chaperones trained on online health information resources at the UT Teen Health Youth Leadership Council Summit. All participants indicated on NNLM training session evaluation forms that they either “somewhat agree” or “strongly agree” that the training improved their ability to find useful online health information, indicating an improvement in health information literacy. Nearly all of them also expressed eagerness to use and tell others about the NLM resources. Additionally, Youth Leadership Council teens were surveyed later regarding their outreach and reported that some of their family members and peers had tried the recipes or were happy to receive a booklet due to the content. One teen reported, “All of my friends thought that these booklets were cool and excited to receive them.” Out of 66 teens, 22 responded to the second survey. The majority of the teens surveyed, 63.6% (14), reported that they had visited at least one health information website since their training at the summit and 77.3% (17) indicated that they had tried or planned to try a recipe found in the booklet.

For more information on this and other library outreach initiatives, feel free to contact Karen Barton at bartonkd@uthscsa.edu or Peg Seger at segerp@uthscsa.edu.

Briscoe Library Scores High in Student Satisfaction Survey

In preparation for the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) site visit, the UT Health San Antonio student survey results were reviewed to provide support for Briscoe Library’s commitment to student satisfaction.

In the 2018 AAMC Graduation Questionnaire, 98.8% of respondents were satisfied or very satisfied with Briscoe Library, compared to the national average of 86.3%. Briscoe Library is happy to report that this number is an increase from 2017’s 93.7%.

The percentage of students who were satisfied or very satisfied with Briscoe Library’s:

  • Ease of access to library resources and holdings: 98%
  • Quality of library support and services: 99%
  • Adequacy of student study space at the medical school campus, including library study space: 95%

We’d like to thank all of the UT Health San Antonio students and we look forward to working with you to continue to make the library an even better space!

Holiday Kisses from Briscoe Library’s Therapy Dogs

Briscoe Library’s own therapy dogs, Angel and June, paid a visit to the library to hand out a little holiday cheer to students studying for exams on Friday, December 7th. Angel and June have both gone through a therapy dog training program with handlers (and librarians) Andrea Schorr and Dana Whitmire. While we have no hard proof, we suspect that students were a little more relaxed when they finally headed out to take that last exam. June and Angel are working hard to do their part in supporting student success!

Library Exam-Time Refreshments: Thanks to SON and SHP!

Thanks to the School of Nursing Student Success Center, students studying hard in the library were treated to cookies and coffee on Tuesday afternoon, December 4th.

On Friday, December 7th, the School of Health Professions provided, cookies, donuts, coffee, hot cider and infused water for students getting ready for exams. One student commented that he was on his way to an exam and the refreshments were just what he needed.

November 2018 UT Health Faculty Publications List

To support our faculty’s research efforts, Briscoe Library has added an additional feature to our monthly newsletter. You are now able to view citations and link to articles from our UT Health Faculty Publications list.  As an added feature, altmetric information is also included. This list is produced monthly by our Library Liaison group who can also provide further assistance with scholarly publication efforts. If you do not see your publication listed, you can provide us with the proper citation information by completing this form.

Click here to view the citations for November 2018 publications.

Featured New Books/E-books for December 2018

NewBooksImage
For a list of the newest titles at the Briscoe Library click here.

Purchase suggestions?
Complete the online Purchase Suggestion Form or contact
Andrea N. Schorr, Head of Resource Management.

 

News from the Libraries November 2018

The November issue of News from the Libraries is now available. For links to individual articles, see the table of contents below.

Image of Research Winners and Awards Reception

2nd Annual Student Appreciation Week Success

Annual P.I. Nixon Dinner Draws a Crowd

Chat With a Librarian

Briscoe Librarians Present at Medical Library Conference

New Library PaperCut Printers Are Here!

October 2018 UT Health Faculty Publications List

Featured New Books/E-books for November 2018

See all past issues of News From the Libraries

Image of Research Winners and Awards Reception

We are pleased to announce the winners of Briscoe Library’s Image of Research Photography Competition!

1st Place
Jaclyn Merlo, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

Rodent Kidney Extracellular Scaffold
The image presented is of a de-cellularized rodent kidney displaying the collagen matrix of the renal vasculature, tubules, and glomeruli. Rapid de-cellularization is accomplished by perfusing a surfactant solution through the renal artery, under exposure to an electric field within a bioreactor. The novel bioreactor, developed at UT Health San Antonio, removes resident cells ten times faster than by traditional de-cellularization technology while preserving elements of the matrix that are critical to directing stem cell differentiation.

High-quality extracellular scaffolds are indispensable for research in regenerative medicine, gene transfer, cancer, and tissue transplantation. The extracellular scaffolds of specific animal tissues can provide templates for the differentiation of human stem cells for the study of diseases in more relevant models, thus facilitating translation to human medicine. Further, the technology is scalable and can prepare large animal and human tissue extracellular scaffolds.

2nd Place
Fabio Vigil, Long School of Medicine

The Universe Within
This image is the merge (overlay) of two photos. The first is a fluorescent microscope photo of a brain slice with the nucleus of all brain cells shining in blue (DAPI) and occasional immune cells shining in green (Iba1). These kind of photos are taken everyday in neuroscience laboratories. The second image is a photo of the Cat’s eye nebula taken by the Hubble space telescope. Looking simultaneously through the microscope and the telescope, this image invites you to think of your brain as a universe within you. The resemblance of the fluorescent cells to stars in the sky is astounding. The image also alludes to a fractal repetition of the same shapes and structures in different scales.

3rd Place
Camila Pereira, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

Airway Space Tour – A 3D Ride
The airway should be free of obstacles such that air can follow its course from the nasal cavity into the lungs. Our research investigates the airway space imbalance that affects children who breath through their mouth while sleeping. Dental 3D radiograph should be used as opportunistic screening tool for sleep-related breathing disorders such as snoring and sleep apnea. These disorders could be caused by hypertrophied tonsils and nasal obstruction between others. Due to the lack of good sleep, children could have low grades at school, difficulty to concentrate, and disturbed cognitive abilities. Other signs such as delayed growth, tiredness, irritability, or lack of energy even to play are related. Ultimately, 3 dimensions of life are affected: craniofacial growth, intellectual development and quality of life. When the dysfunction is detected early enough, the consequences can be reduced or even eliminated. We hope the translation of our research project will increase awareness and raise the attention of the dental professionals’ and the general public to this matter. The sleep disordered breathing is a public health issue and surveillance is essential. Let’s take this ride!

IPE Award
Sarah Khoury & Daryl Gaspar, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

Treatment in the Stars
Astrocytes carry great potential for stroke treatment and research conducted in the past has generally ignored their ability to heal neurons. Research suggests that use of fatty acid oxidation by astrocytes may be useful for healing, and protecting tissues that have been affected by stroke. Triiodothyronine (T3), a thyroid hormone, stimulates fatty acid oxidation, stimulating the production of ATP in astrocytes. In mice treated with T3 stroke lesion volumes are smaller than those without treatment. In this image the brighter activated astrocytes indicate a stressed brain, one that has experienced an injury. T3, the constellation found in the middle of the image may one day be used for stroke treatment.

 

Briscoe Library’s Image of Research Photography Competition came to a close with an awards reception during Student Appreciation Week on Thursday, November 1st. All entrants, Image of Research Judges, contest sponsors, students, faculty, and staff were invited to come view the entries, meet the winners, and enjoy refreshments.

   

  

2nd Annual Student Appreciation Week Success

Please enjoy a few pictures from the week long activities during the 2018 Student Appreciation Week, October 29th through November 2nd, 2018.

SGA Secretary Samantha Yee and Vice-President Mustafa Mithaiwala cut the ribbon at a celebration for the new Library food vending area made possible by funds from the Student Fee Fund. (10/29/18)

Students enjoying coffee and cake at the ribbon cutting celebration. (10/29/18)

Library Liaisons Karen Barton (SHP), Chris Gaspard (SOM), and Christy Tyson (SOD) prepare for the student paint party complete with spooky drinks and pumpkin cookies.

(10/30/18)

Students enjoy spooky drinks and treats with Liaison Librarian Christy Tyson. (10/30/18)

Students talk with Miguel Vazquez, M.D., creator of Starletta. (10/30/18)

Students line up to take part in the Student Photo Wall. The School of Health Professions was the winner with the most participation! (10/30/18)

Students getting pictures taken at the Halloween Photo Wall (10/31/18).

Students getting to know Library therapy dogs June and Angel along with handlers, Resource Management Librarians Dana Whitmire and Andrea Schorr. (11/2/18)

Students lined up each day to spin the wheel for prizes.


Student wins a prize!

Annual P.I. Nixon Dinner Draws a Crowd

 

The message to the 120 attendees of the 48th Annual Friends of the Nixon Medical Historical Library Dinner this year (on Friday October 26th) was that, yes, sugar is bad for you. Author Gary Taubes, award-winning science and health journalist, shared an historical account of the tracking of diabetes rates and made a convincing case that sugar is the tobacco of the new millennium. This did not, however, keep some of those in attendance from eating their dessert.

The subject, though lighthearted at times, bears undeniably serious considerations for the role of diet and nutrition in the health of our U.S. population as well as the health of our healthcare system. Outgoing President of the Friends, Eithan Kotkowski, was on hand to introduce Mr. Taubes and pass the gavel on to incoming Friends President, Dr. Anand Karnad. Mr. Kotkowski has also written a more detailed account of Mr. Taube’s work in an article for The Pipette Gazette.