News from the Libraries

News from the Libraries

TEDMED will offer opportunities for inspiration, innovation, and imagination

Collage of images from TEDMEDInteractive Simulcast at the UT Health Science Center, April 10-13, 2012

Since 2009, TEDMED has been the conference where the world’s most creative minds have gathered to meet healthcare’s most innovative science.  An offshoot of the renowned TED (Technology+Entertainment+Design) conferences, TEDMED is an unparalleled interdisciplinary experience, bringing together great minds from dozens of medical and non-medical fields for a new kind of intellectual cross-pollination.  The result is a unique opportunity for inspiration, innovation, and imagination — a chance to envision the future of health and healthcare in entirely new ways.  To get a sense of the experience, see http://tedmed.com/videos to view past TEDMED talks.

Normally, onsite delegates to TEDMED pay an event fee of $4,950 to attend.  This April,  TEDMED can be experienced right here at the Health Science Center at no charge.  TEDMEDLive is an interactive simulcast — sponsored by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and hosted here by the Libraries, Information Management & Services (IMS), and the Academic Center for Excellence in Teaching (ACET) — that puts you in the front row of  TEDMED 2012 right here on campus.

Go to http://bit.ly/tedmedhsc for session times and locations.  If you’re planning to attend, please use the form on that page to RSVP.  If you have questions or need more information, please contact Luke Rosenberger at rosenberger@uthscsa.edu or (210) 567-2486.

Librarians in the news

Photograph of Angela MyattAngela Myatt, Curriculum Liaison Librarian, has been appointed as Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Clinical Epidemiology.  Angela will be supporting the mission of the division with literature searches for existing and future  grant applications, by keeping current with grant opportunities relevant to the division and  by instructing  faculty, residents and students on the principles of evidence based clinical practice, including PICO, the evidence cycle, and critical appraisal skills.



Photograph of Chris Gaspard, Katie Prentice, and Eric Willman holding their bookChris Gaspard, Head of Access Services and Interlibrary Loan; Katie Prentice, Head of Education and Information Services; and Eric Willman, Systems Librarian contributed to the newly published Introduction to Research and Medical Literature for Health Professionals. The book was edited by Dennis Blessing, Associate Dean of the School of Health Professions,– and Glenn Forister, Director of Physician Assistant Studies.

Introduction to Research and Medical Literature for Health Professionals is designed to guide writers through the complete research process.  It begins with the reasons for and importance of scholarship, then continues with the research and writing process and concludes with uses for research.

The three librarians contributed to “Chapter 17: References”, which covers several common writing styles used in scholarly and professional writing.  The chapter includes information about identifying instructions to authors and using the internet for research.  In addition, it covers ethical writing and the basics of copyright.

A copy of the book has been ordered for the Briscoe Library.

 

New consumer website: NIH Clinical Research Trials and You

The National Institutes of Health has created a new website, NIH Clinical Research Trials and You (http://www.nih.gov/health/clinicaltrials/) to help people learn more about clinical trials, why they matter, and how to participate.

NIH Clinical Research Trials and You

http://www.nih.gov/health/clinicaltrials/


 
Clinical trials are essential for identifying and understanding ways to prevent, diagnose, and treat disease. Research has shown that among the greatest challenges to recruitment of volunteers is the lack of general knowledge about what trials involve, where they are carried out, and who may participate.

Visitors to the website will find information about:

  • The basics of clinical trial participation
  • First hand experiences from actual clinical trial volunteers
  • Explanations from researchers
  • Links on how to search for a trial or enroll in a research matching program

In addition, health care professionals can read about evidence-based strategies for talking with patients about trials, print audience-tested posters to help promote trials in clinics and offices, and find other educational materials.

NIH supports clinical research trials across the country and throughout the world. NIH’s ongoing effort to raise awareness about clinical research and educate potential clinical trial participants about the option of a clinical trial is vital to developing public support and understanding for how clinical research drives medical discovery and improves health outcomes.

Mobile access to TOXNET® is now available

Toxnet Mobile AccessTOXNET®, the National Library of Medicine’s integrated database of hazardous chemicals, toxic releases and environmental health information, is now accessible from any mobile device.

Launch mobile TOXNET at http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/pda/.

New to the shelves of the Briscoe Library

The big picture : gross anatomy The big picture : gross anatomy / David A. Morton, K. Bo Foreman, Kurt H. Albertine.
New York : McGraw-Hill Medical, c2011.
QS 18.2 M891b 2011.

 

 

Bates' nursing guide to physical examination and history taking Bates’ nursing guide to physical examination and history taking / Beth Hogan-Quigley, Mary Louise Palm, Lynn S. Bickley.
Philadelphia : Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, c2012.
WY 100.4 H714b 2012.

 

 

Cancer disparities : causes and evidence-based solutionsCancer disparities : causes and evidence-based solutions / Ronit Elk, Hope Landrine, editors.
New York : Springer Publishing, c2012.
QZ 220.AA1 C215 2012.

 

 

 

Netter's head and neck anatomy for dentistry

Netter’s head and neck anatomy for dentistry, 2nd ed. / Neil S. Norton ; illustrations by Frank H. Netter ; contributing illustrators, Carlos A.G. Machado … [et al.].
Philadelphia, Pa. : Elsevier/Saunders, c2012.
WU 17 N886n 2012.

 

 

Principles of translational science in medicine : from bench to bedside Principles of translational science in medicine : from bench to bedside / edited by Martin Wehling ; foreword by Francesco M. Marincola.
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, c2010.
W 20.55.T7 P957 2010.

 

 

 

Systematic reviews to support evidence-based medicine : how to review and apply findings of healthcare research, 2nd ed.Systematic reviews to support evidence-based medicine : how to review and apply findings of healthcare research, 2nd ed. / Kalid Khan … [et al.].
London : Hodder Arnold, c2011.
WB 102.5 S995 2011.

 

Andrea N. Schorr, Collection Resources Librarian

 

News from the Libraries – February 2012

Jove-Journal of Visualized Experiments

The Libraries now subcribe to the Journal of Visualized Experiments. Learn more about it in this issue of News from the Libraries.

In the news this month:

Hear Elva Trevino Hart: Author to speak at noon on February 24

One Community/One Book: Find out how you can participate

Library classes for February and March

Chocolate: Exhibit opens February 10

Briscoe Library adds more hours for study

Anne Comeaux earns designation as Certified Records Manager

Featured resource: Journal of Visualized Experiments

New to the shelves of the Briscoe Library

New resources from the National Library of Medicine

Hear Elva Treviño Hart: Author to speak February 24

Photograph of Elva Trevino Hart

Elva Treviño Hart will speak in the Holly Auditorium at noon on Friday, February 24.

Elva Treviño Hart, author of Barefoot Heart: Stories of a Migrant Child, is the featured guest for this year’s One Community/One Book program.  She will speak Friday, February 24, 2012 at 12:00 noon in the Holly Auditorium on the campus of the UT Health Science Center in San Antonio.  The program will be followed by a book signing.

The program can also be viewed via videoconferencing in Harlingen (RAHC 2.120) and Laredo (AB 1.106).  Update (2/23): For those who can’t attend in person, the program will also be webcast live.  Tune in at http://bit.ly/ETH0224 at 12 noon CST on the day of the presentation.

“My whole childhood, I never had a bed,” Hart’s story begins. It traces her journey from rural South Texas and the beet farms of the Upper Midwest to the graceful campus of Stanford University and, eventually, corporate America.

The book vividly details the deprivation and discrimination faced by the Treviños, along with their joys, triumphs and everyday life. Hart went on to earn degrees in theoretical mathematics and computer science/engineering, which allowed her to make more money than she had ever dreamed possible. Still, she felt out of place, and she ultimately left the corporate world and used writing to bridge her past and present.

The importance of storytelling is a thread that is woven throughout Barefoot Heart.  As a young  child in the mid- 1950s, Hart would wait by the family car during the long hours that her parents and her five siblings worked in the beet fields of Minnesota and Wisconsin.  She would make up stories to pass the time.  Later in the evenings, the family would gather to listen and to tell stories.  In a world without toys, books or television, storytelling was both art and entertainment.

In Barefoot Heart, Hart gathers the stories of several lifetimes within one cover.  Each chapter begins with a dicho, or saying.  She says she organized her writing in this way to honor her father, who sometimes would make  up dichos on the spot, though he also knew many traditional Mexican folk sayings.  Each dicho carries the  same message of the chapter that follows.  “I wanted to take people with me to the migrant camps and the fields so they could see what it was like,” she told an interviewer last March, when Barefoot Heart was selected for a community read in Huntington Beach, California.

“I didn’t start out wanting to write a book,” she says.  Instead, she signed up for a “write your life story” class at a local YMCA.  One of her classmates loved Hart’s stories so much she shared them with her husband, a communications professor, who decided to feature them at an annual short story event he hosted.  At the end of the evening, the professor got a standing ovation, and people said they would like to buy the book. “That’s when I decided it might be a book,” she says.

Elva Trevino Hart’s February 24 presentation on the UT Health Science Center’s Long campus is part of One Community/One Book 2012.  Partners in this year’s program include the San Antonio Public Library– where Hart will speak on the evening of Thursday, February 23, the Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics, and the Academic Center for Excellence in Teaching.

The program is  made possible in part by a grant from Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

More information about One Community/One Book can be found on the project website: http://library.uthscsa.edu/2012/01/onebook/.

Download a printed flyer for One Community/ One Book, and help us spread the word:

http://library.uthscsa.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/ocob2012poster.pdf.

Susan Hunnicutt, Special Projects Librarian with Sheila Hotchkin, Media Communications Officer

One Community/One Book: Find out how you can participate

Barefoot Heart CoverOne Community/One Book 2012 is well on its way!  More than 30 individuals attended training for discussion group leaders in December and January.  The training is not required, and anyone can plan a book discussion. The encouragement and the information we provide helps build confidence to get the discussion groups off the ground.

Another resource to support book discussions is the One Community/One Book project website:

http://library.uthscsa.edu/onebook

Some of the things that can be found there:

  • A printable flyer
  • Information about the One Community/One Book 2012 selection, Barefoot Heart: Stories of a Migrant Child, by Elva Treviño Hart
  • A set of clinically-oriented questions written by Dr. Adelita Cantu of the School of Nursing, which some groups may find useful
  • Post Your Book Discussion, a form to use if you would like us to help you publicize your book discussion on the website
  • A Book Discussion Sign In Sheet  that we will use to evaluate the effectiveness of the program once it is complete
  • Information about Elva Treviño Hart’s two public events in San Antonio, on the evening of February 23 (at San Antonio Public Library) and at noon on February 24 (in the Holly Auditorium in San Antoni0, with videoconferencing to Harlingen and Laredo)
  • A little bit about the history of One Community/One Book at the UT Health Science Center, and about our planning process

If you do host or lead a book discussion, please be sure your group completes the Book Discussion Sign In Sheet.  These can be sent to Susan Hunnicutt, Special Projects Librarian, Hunnicutt@uthscsa.edu.

One Community/One Book 2012 is made possible in part by a grant from Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Library classes for February and March

Link to Library Classes

REGISTER TODAY! Scan this code with your smartphone camera QR reader app to find library classes online.

The Libraries offer classes, consultations and other training to assist with the effective use of databases and research tools.  All library classes are free and open to all.  Register today to reserve your spot!

Schedule a special class
To schedule a special class or orientation for your department or group at other days/times, please contact the library at (210) 567-2450 or email AskaLibrarian@uthscsa.edu.

Integrating library research skills into academic course content
Faculty are encouraged to consider integrating library research skills into course content.  Librarians are available to develop and teach classes that meet specific needs or are about a specific resource.  To learn more or to schedule a class, contact Katie Prentice at prenticek@uthscsa.edu or call 210-567-6606.

To register for a class or to see complete class descriptions, visit the Attend a Library Class page.

 

Briscoe Library – San Antonio

  • Using EBSCO CINAHL to Locate Nursing & Allied Health Information: February 9, 2012, 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm, LIB 2.011
  • Library Basics: February 13, 2012, 10:00 am – 11:00 am, LIB 2.011
  • Introduction to RefWorks: February 16, 2012, 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm, LIB 2.011
  • Google Scholar for Scientific and Clinical Literature Searches: February 29, 2012, 9:00 am – 10:00 am, LIB 2.011
  • Creating and Presenting a Professional Poster Session: March 7, 2012, 12 noon – 1:00 pm, LIB 4.074
  • Introduction to EndNote: March 8, 2012: 9:00 am – 10:00 am, LIB 2.011
  • Getting Started with Ovid MEDLINE: March 9, 2012, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm, LIB 2.011
  • Creating and Presenting a Professional Poster Session: March 15, 2012, 12 noon – 1:00 pm, LIB 4.074
  • Creating and Presenting a Professional Poster Session: March 20, 2012, 12 noon – 1:00 pm, LIB 4.074
  • Introduction to PubMed: March 28, 2012, 9:00 am – 10:00 am, LIB 2.011

Katie Prentice, Head of Education and Information Services

Chocolate: Exhibit opens February 10

Mixtec Marriage of Lord Eight Deer and Lady Thirteen Serpent

The sharing of chocolate is a common theme in pre-Columbian art. In this Mixtec image, Lord Eight Deer and Lady Thirteen Serpent exchange a cup of chocolate on the occasion of their marriage.

For centuries chocolate has been treasured not only for its amazing and delightful taste, but also for its healthful benefits.

The first historical evidence for dietary uses of chocolate dates back more than 3000 years. The native peoples of Mesoamerica– among them the Inca, the Maya and the Aztec– believed that cocoa was a gift from the gods. From the earliest days, chocolate (in Nahuatl, xocolatl) was seen as a medium of divine communication.  Goblets of chocolate appear frequently in pre-Columbian art and legend, in stories involving figures both divine and human.

The Spanish explorer Hernan Cortez was the first European to taste chocolate– possibly because he was mistaken for a god by the Aztec emperor Montezuma.  In 1519, Cortez reported that the beverage the Aztecs concocted from fruit of the cocoa tree was believed by Montezuma to be a “divine drink, which builds up resistance and fights fatigue.”  Also, “a cup of this precious drink permits a man to walk for a whole day without food.”

Chocolate has been gathering extravagant claims and accolades of one kind or another ever since.

Recently, scientific studies of the health benefits of chocolate , and specifically of  cocoa, which is the essential ingredient in chocolate, have focused on the actions of two flavonoids, catechin and epicatechin.  Both have protective antioxidant properties and are found in tea and many fruits, including apricots, cherries, peaches, blackberries and apples.  However, they occur in extravagantly high levels in cocoa.  As it turns out, chocolate — or more precisely cocoa– may actually be very good for your heart, and for other things as well.

At least that’s what some people are saying…

Contemplate the many uses of chocolate while visiting our exhibit, Not Just Another Love Story, in the Medical School Lecture Hall Commons beginning February 10.  Then, stop by the Circulation Desk on Valentine’s Day.  Chocolate will be enjoyed.

Susan Hunnicutt, Special Projects Librarian