News from the Libraries

News from the Libraries

News from the Libraries May 2019

The May issue of News from the Libraries is now available. For links to individual articles, see the table of contents below.

School of Nursing Historical Photographs On Display

Nursing Faculty from Mexico Visit the Nixon Historical Library

FRANKENSTEIN IS COMING!

Did You Get to See Angel?

E-Resource of the Month: SCImago Journal Ranking (SJR)

Featured New Books/E-books for May 2019

See all past issues of News From the Libraries

School of Nursing Historical Photographs On Display

Please come take a look at the latest library exhibit!

In honor of the recent National Nurses Week and the 2019 50th Anniversary of the UT Health School of Nursing (SON), a photography exhibit has been installed in the library. The exhibit features photographs from the archives of the Briscoe Library and the SON collection. Note: A number of the photographs discovered in the SON collection while preparing for the 50th Anniversary will become part of the library archival collection making them accessible to a wider audience.

With one exception, all of the photographs on display can generally be identified as circa 1970s and 1980s. Historical photographs often come to library archives unidentified which is the case with some of the photographs on display.  Challenge: However, one photograph is distinctly more recent than the others and we think viewers will be able to tell which it is.

For questions about the library archives, please contact Melissa DeThorne at 210-567-2470 or dethorne@uthscsa.edu.

 

 

Nursing Faculty from Mexico Visit the Nixon Historical Library

On Friday, May 17, 2019 nursing faculty from Mexico toured the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library. Several works from the rare book collection were on display, including Florence Nightingale’s Notes on Nursing (1859), Ophthalmodouleia (1583) by Georg Bartisch, Anatomical Tables of the Practice of Midwifery (1754) by William Smellie , and De Medicina (1481) by Aulus Cornelius Celsus. Also on display were photographs from the Physicians and Surgeons Hospital Training School for Nurses in San Antonio, which opened its doors in the early 1900’s but was closed in the 1960’s.  Photographs from the early years of the School of Nursing were also on display.

For more information about the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library or to schedule a visit, contact Andrea N. Schorr at schorr@uthscsa.edu or (210) 567-2403.

Did You Get to See Angel?

Accompanied by owner, librarian Andrea Schorr, Angel made her appearance during the Coffee Cookies and Canines event for students on May 8th.

Angel is a certified therapy dog and is available for other campus visits along with her partner June. For more information on booking this library therapy dog team for your event, contact Andrea Schorr at 210-567-2440/schorr@uthscsa.edu or Dana Whitmire at 210-567-2464/whitmired@uthscsa.edu.

E-Resource of the Month: SCImago Journal Ranking (SJR)

Trying to figure out which journal to publish in? SCImago Journal Ranking (SJR) can help you decide!

SJR is based on prestige from a journal to another, using current year citations to the source items published in that journal during the previous three years. SJR, a counterpart to Impact Factors, is freely available through the SCImago website. Find out more information on the Impact Factors and Other Metrics libguide.

Quick view of Impact Factor vs SJR:

Impact Factor

SJR

Definition

Citations to a journal in the JCR year to items published in the previous two years, divided by the total number of citable items (articles and reviews) published in the journal in the previous two years.

Average number of weighted citations received in a year, by articles published in a journal in the previous 3 years.

Source

InCites Journal Citation Reports (JCR) – drawing on the data in Web of Science

Scopus

A measure of

Citation Impact

Prestige

Availability

Subscription access via JCR

Freely available via SCImago website

Journal titles

11,500+

34,000+

How is it calculated?

The number of citations of articles published in the source journal in the preceding two years divided by the number of items published in that journal in the previous two years.

Iterative process based on transfer of prestige from a journal to another, using current year citations to the source items published in that journal during the previous three years

Citations included

All document types (including editorials)

Articles, conference papers and reviews

Documents included

Articles and reviews

Articles, conference papers and reviews

Interdisciplinary comparisons

Not useful for comparing disciplines. You should only compare Impact Factors for journals in the same field.

Yes. The rank has been normalized to account for differences between the disciplines

Strengths

  • Covers approximately 11,500 scholarly and technical journals and conference proceedings
  • Can exclude self-citations
  • Includes journals in 236 disciplines
  • Assigns higher value/weight to citations form more prestigious journals
  • Compensates for differences in field, type and age
  • Meaningful benchmark is built in – 1 is average for a subject

Weaknesses

  • Does not necessarily reflect the quality of individual articles
  • Limited to journals within Web of Science
  • Cannot be used to compare journals across different subject categories
  • Small numbers can be off-putting to researchers
  • Complicated and difficult to validate
  • No idea of magnitude: how many citations does it represent?

Featured New Books/E-books for May 2019

NewBooksImage
For a list of the newest titles at the Briscoe Library click here.

Purchase suggestions?
Complete the online Purchase Suggestion Form or contact
Andrea N. Schorr, Head of Resource Management.

 

News from the Libraries April 2019

The April issue of News from the Libraries is now available. For links to individual articles, see the table of contents below.

New Library Reflection Room Dedicated During Fiesta Celebration

2nd Annual Image of Research Winners and Awards Reception

Danny Jones Essay Winner Presents During Library Fiesta Celebration

Librarian Jonquil Feldman Announces Retirement

Korean Nursing Students Visit the Nixon Historical Library

Librarians Present Webinar on Predatory Publishing for NNLM

Library Gallery Opening April 22, 5:30 to 7:00 p.m.

Laredo Regional Campus News

E-Resource of the Month: ClinicalKey Presentation Maker

Featured New Books/E-books for April 2019

See all past issues of News From the Libraries

New Library Reflection Room Dedicated During Fiesta Celebration

 

Omar Akram

Helen Fleck

It’s been a little over a year since a student group led by Omar Akram came to Briscoe Library with a proposal to set aside a room for a meditation space where students would be able to pray or meditate in privacy and comfort. Thanks to many campus collaborators on the project, a room was identified and eventually transformed into a new space that was dedicated at a ribbon-cutting and reception during Briscoe Library’s Fiesta Celebration on April 11th.

Doing the honors for the ribbon-cutting were Omar Akram and Helen Fleck, SGA Secretary. Pictured below are John Kaulfus, (Chief Student Affairs Officer, Title IX Director) representing the Office of Academic, Faculty and Student Affairs, Paulina Mazurek (Director of Wellness & Professional Formation) representing the Office for Undergraduate Medical Education, and Owen Ellard Senior Director of Libraries. Attending along with many other students, faculty and staff was Arthur Campos (Architect) representing the Office of Facilities Management and many of his team who worked on the creation of the room.

The room, decorated to inspire a reflective atmosphere, also features 6 black and white photos from a collection taken by campus photographer (Creative Media Services), Brandi Jenkins.

For more information about the room, please contact Peg Seger, segerp@uthscsa.edu.

2nd Annual Image of Research Winners and Awards Reception

We are pleased to announce the winners of Briscoe Library’s 2nd Annual Image of Research Photography Competition!

1st Place
Kristina Andrijauskaite, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

Winter’s Tale
This picture depicts zebrafish embryo which travels across the crystallized well of the tissue culture plate. There are different animal models used in scientific research. However, zebrafish have many advantages, such as its rapid development, transparency and suitability for in vivo imaging. I use zebrafish to study microgravity induced alterations on vascularization and stress responses. First, I expose them to simulated gravity and then I spend numerous hours looking at them under the microscope and uncovering the world of imagination. I believe you do not have to travel thousands of miles to capture magnificent winter images; as they can be discovered by looking through the microscope lenses in the UTHSCSA lab.

2nd Place
Elliott Moss & Alexander Hutchinson, Long School of Medicine

Hear a Murmur, Save a Life
Cardiac murmurs are found in 1-3% of newborns. Of those with a murmur, as many as half are associated with some degree of congenital anomaly of the heart. With modern day management, babies born with congenital heart defects live to adulthood about 95% of the time. Untreated, congenital heart defects are one of the leading causes of mortality in newborns. These facts help underlie the truth that detecting a murmur and deciding on a correct management plan is a vital part of caring for a neonate as a pediatrician. Unfortunately, there currently is no standardized protocol for the assessment and management of a neonatal murmur. All management decisions are made simply based on the pediatrician’s experience and intuition. Our team is working with the Pediatric Cardiology department of UT Health to implement and refine a standardized protocol for how to proceed when a murmur is auscultated in a neonatal patient by one of our pediatricians. We hope to improve neonatal health outcomes, prevent both insufficient and excessive testing, and help ease the decision-making burden on the pediatricians.

3rd Place
Breeanne Soteros, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

La Reazione Nera
The precise organization of synapses in the brain anatomically define and link the neural circuits that give rise to all our thoughts, emotions and behaviors. At every moment, synapses are formed and restructured with incredible specificity in response to each of our experiences. Our research seeks to understand the molecular mechanisms which enable the specificity of these synaptic events. We utilize various molecular, cellular and behavioral approaches to delineate the genes that govern synapse formation, maintenance and elimination in the central nervous system.

Pictured here, we see the beautifully complex structure of a Purkinje cell – made possible by “la reazione nera” (the black reaction) – a stain invented in the 1870s by the late scientist Camillo Golgi. Golgi’s stain enables the visualization of dendritic spines – fine protrusions along the dendrite where excitatory synapses occur. By use of genetic manipulation and Golgi staining, we can begin to tease apart the genes that shape the synaptic landscape throughout the lifespan.

IPE Award
Kunal Baxi (Cancer Biology), Nicole Hensch (IBMS – Cell Biology, Genetics & Molecular Medicine), and Amanda Lipsitt (Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Clinical Fellow)

Glow Fish Glow
This image shows a 5 day old zebrafish embryo that has been genetically modified to express red, blue, and yellow fluorescent proteins from a transgenic cassette (Brainbow). The gene encoding each fluorescent protein is flanked by two pairs of lox sites that are recognized by the Cre recombinase. Without Cre-induced recombination, the first protein (red) in the array will be expressed. Cre expression results in one of three outcomes: red (no recombination), blue (recombination event 1), or yellow (recombination event 2). When additional copies of the Brainbow cassette are inserted into a cell, these three primary colors can be mixed, thereby increasing possible color combinations. This diversity of color using a single promoter provides a powerful platform for studying a variety of biological processes such as neuronal morphology and cell lineage tracking. We use this system as a tool to study heterogeneity of cells within a soft tissue tumor (rhabdomyosarcoma) using zebrafish as a model system.

 

Briscoe Library’s 2nd Annual Image of Research Photography Competition came to a close with an awards reception during the library’s Fiesta Celebration on Thursday, April 11th. All entrants, Image of Research Judges, contest sponsors, students, faculty, and staff were invited to come view the entries, meet the winners, and enjoy refreshments.