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CoC Nominee Form

Communities and Their Assets

Communities and Their Assets:

Community Asset Mapping for CTSA Community Engagement

Building community connections and partnerships in support of medical research, educationand practice that really work to impact community health

The UT Health Science Center Libraries are partnering with the South Central Area Health Education Center (AHEC) and the Lower Rio Grande Valley AHEC to advance community engagement,  foster collaboration and promote library involvement in community engagement among the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) recipient institutions in the South Central Region. This is a pilot project for  (CTSA) Institutions in the South Central Region (SCR) of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM).

The following events are being planned:

Asset-Based Community Development (ABCD) Workshop

How to build community connections and partnerships in support of medical research, education and practice that really work to impact community health.

      San Antonio

      Thursday, February 21, 2013, 1:00 – 4:00 p.m., La Quinta Horizon Hill Conference Center, San Antonio

      Harlingen – Mario E. Ramirez Library

      Thursday, March 7, 2013, 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon,   RAHC Auditorium

Strategic Planning Workshop, San Antonio

Limited to librarians and other personnel from institutions with a current Clinical and Translation Science Award or with a CTSA application pending or in the planning stages.

How librarians can be actively involved with CTSA key functions, CTSA administration, grant applications, research output and impact tracking, community engagement, and other CTSA initiatives.

     Friday, February 22, 2013, 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon, Location TBD

For more information contact:

segerp@uthscsa.edu in San Antonio

reynag@uthscsa.edu in Harlingen

 

This project has been funded in whole or in part with Federal funds from the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, under Contract No. HHSN-276—2011-00007-C with the Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library.

Community Health Education for Community Health Workers

NWVista_CHWRevised2_9-20-14During the 1990s the skin staph infection community-acquired (CA) Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) first emerged as an important cause of infection in communities. On September 20th, the UT Health Science Center Libraries provided a presentation for area Community Health Workers (CHWs) about recent South Texas research on CA-MRSA. The CHWs were attending a continuing education day sponsored by the NW Vista College Community Health Worker program.

The Community Health Worker program at Northwest Vista College prepares students to work in public health, private health care delivery systems, community-based social service agencies, and health care insurance organizations. Community Health Workers provide services to increase wellness and improve access to health services through outreach activities to target populations.

In Texas, Community Health Worker programs are certified by the Texas State Department of Health as an authorized and certified training site for Community Health Workers. Senate Bill 1051 (77th Texas Legislative Sessions) calls for the Texas Department of State Health Services to establish and operate a training and certification program for persons who act as promotores or community health workers, instructors and sponsoring institutions/training programs.

The Library presentation focused on a community health education project that resulted from research on the rate of CA-MRSA in skin and soft tissue infections done in 10 clinics in 4 counties in South Texas by the University of Texas at Austin College of Pharmacy and the UT Health Science Center Pharmacotherapy Education & Research Center. The initiative brought together the Libraries, researchers, the South Central Area Health Education Center, UHS CareLink Clinic, and other community partners to improve awareness about CA-MRSA.

 

Congratulations Monica Salazar

Monica SalazarCongratulations to library staff member, Monica Salazar!  Monica received her Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing from the University of Texas Pan American in May 2014 and passed the NCLEX-RN examination for licensure as a Registered Nurse in January. In addition to working as a library clerical assistant, Monica has been an avid user of the Ramirez Library, taking advantage of its many resources while working towards her nursing degree.  Monica plans to incorporate her past experience as an EMT into her career by pursuing a position as a critical care nurse in the Rio Grande Valley with the expectation of obtaining her Master’s degree in the near future.

Danny Jones Essay Contest Deadline October 15, 2014

Picture of drawing anatomical drawing of skull by Leonardo Da Vinci

Skull drawing by Leonardo Da Vinci, 1489  (in public domain)

Attention students, residents, and fellows!

Is there a story from the history of the health sciences or public health that has inspired you in some way?  That has shaped your understanding of humanity’s quest for scientific knowledge or the development of effective clinical or public health practice?   If so, consider submitting an essay for the 2014 Danny Jones History of the Health Sciences Student Essay Competition.

The essay can be on any topic related to the history of the health sciences, including history of medicine, dentistry, nursing, public health, or any other health science or profession.  Previously unpublished essays, including non-winning essays submitted previously, will be accepted.

A prize of $500 will be awarded to the best essay and will be presented at the Friends of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library’s Annual Dinner on November  6, 2014. The contest is open to current students in any of the schools of the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, as well as to affiliated residents and fellows.

Word limit No more than 2500 words

Deadline October 15, 2014

Format Please send entries in pdf format to comeaux@uthscsa.edu

For further information contact: Anne Comeaux, Assistant Director for Special Collections University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Libraries P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library 210-567-2428

 

Did you know? Interlibrary Loan

Medical library collections provide users with knowledge to inform patient care, research, class assignments, personal health decisions, and general enlightenment. With limited budgets and the rising cost of subscriptions, it is not feasible for libraries to own every book or journal subscription their constituents might need. The Interlibrary Loan Service is a collaboration with other libraries to provide journal articles and books that the UT Health Science Center Library does not own, and to fulfill requests from other libraries for items that are in the HSC collection.

In FY 2014, the UT Health Science Library processed the following:

  • 1,587 items borrowed from other libraries
  • 6,885 items delivered to other libraries or to individuals through Loansome Doc
  •    722 items delivered to area health professionals

To request a book or journal article through Interlibrary Loan, the requester must first create and then log in to an account in the ILLiad system.

Log in to Illiad button

When searching online in PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, Web of Science, or other databases, clicking on the HSCLink will retrieve the article. If the library does not subscribe to the journal, an option to “Get through Interlibrary Loan” will appear.

The process has been streamlined so that the turnaround time for delivery of articles is now a  couple of days rather than weeks. UT Health Science Center (HSC) students, faculty and staff can request delivery of journal articles directly to their email. Book chapters are scanned and also emailed to requesters. Print book copies are still delivered the old-fashioned way, by mail or courier. Best of all, the service is free to HSC requesters–except for rush orders. This service is also available for a fee to licensed, practicing area health professionals.

For more information, contact AskaLibrarian@uthscsa.edu or call 210-567-2450.

Jonquil Feldman

Director, Briscoe Library and Outreach Services

 

Everyday Miracles Exhibit at the Ramirez Library

Ex-votoThe Mario E. Ramirez, M.D., Library at the Regional Academic Health Center in Harlingen is hosting a traveling exhibit from the National Library of Medicine called, Everyday Miracles: Medical Imagery in Ex-Votos.

The exhibit explores the relationship between healing and faith through the ex-voto, a devotional painting that gives thanks for a miraculous healing or blessing.  The exhibit will run from May 7th – June 16th.

Find an online journal

The way to locate full-text articles depends on how much detail you have about the item. Start by clicking the E-journals tab on the Library homepage.

Ejournals Tab

  • If you have an e-journal citation, from the Library homepage, click “E-journal” to get started. Type the journal title in the box or use the MEDLINE abbreviation.
  • If we have an online version of the journal, the title will be listed with the years of electronic coverage.
Serial Solutions results page

 

  • In the event that we do not have electronic coverage, click “Try the Library Catalog” button to see if we have it in print in the Library.
  • Journal title results are shown with links to the years of coverage.  Choose the link to Journal button that matches the year of your citation.

Getting to Full-Text from Library Databases

From inside most Library Databases, when working on an article search for a topic, you will see buttons that say HSCLink.  These buttons connect you to the Library’s e-journal system.

HSCLink page

Things to remember

If you need help finding library materials, contact Askalibrarian, call (210) 567-2450, or come by the library.

To login from off campus, use your domain username/password. Give the library a call if you encounter any problems or errors with the log in process.

 

First Do No Harm – an Exhibit on Medical Ethics

First Do No Harm?, a new exhibit in the Briscoe Library 3rd floor exhibit cases, focuses on medical ethics.  This exhibit describes medical experiments in the United States as well as Germany that actually harmed participants in the name of science.  People were deliberately exposed to plutonium though ingestion of food, total body irradiation, shots, and atomic explosions.  Nazi’s experimented during WW II on concentration camp inmates.  Syphilis studies were conducted on black men in Alabama where treatment was withheld deliberately.  In all cases, the experimenters seemed to justify the harm to their subjects by the knowledge they hoped to gain.

The exhibit will be available March 1 – March 31, 2014.  Contact Anne Comeaux, comeaux@uthscsa.edu, or Mellisa DeThorne, dethorne@uthscsa.edu, for more information.

Troops of the Battalion Combat Team, U.S. Army 11th Airborne Division, watch a plum of radioactive smoke arise after a D-Day blast at Yucca Flats during Exercise 'Desert Rock I' reaches its peak.  Nov. 1, 1951.  (Courtesy of the National Archives & Records Administration)

Troops of the Battalion Combat Team, U.S. Army 11th Airborne Division, watch a plum of radioactive smoke arise after a D-Day blast at Yucca Flats as Exercise ‘Desert Rock I’ reaches its peak. Nov. 1, 1951. (Courtesy of the National Archives & Records Administration)

George Bartisch: An Inventive Look Into Ophthalmodouleia

Image of George Bartisch

Image of George Bartisch

 

Buying a pair of glasses is something that has become quite common, and most times can even be done over the internet. Beyond a routine checkup, more serious ocular issues may suggest a trip to the local ophthalmologist, but even that is often quite convenient due to technology and medical advances. Typically you can be diagnosed and treated within a few visits. These simple luxuries are available to us because of the extraordinary research, practices, and innovations of a German physician, George Bartisch.

Born in 1535 and growing up in a poor lower class family, Bartisch was not expected to reach the level of knowledge and expertise that he did. He longed to learn and know more, especially in the area of medicine. Because his family could not afford to send him to a formal school to satisfy his passion, he found an outlet that would suffice, and even grow, his innate knowledge about the human body, particularly the eye. He became an apprentice for a barber surgeon in Dresden at the age of 13. This was followed by two additional apprenticeships to an oculist and a lithotomist.  Through these apprenticeships, he was able to become a successful wound surgeon, lithotomist, oculist, and teacher of surgical anatomy.

Being extremely influenced by the culture around him, Bartisch brought his knowledge of quirky superstitions, magic, astrology, and witchcraft into his research of the eye. Believing there were certain stellar constellations that were favorable for the eye was one of his assumptions. He accredited many malformations and diseases of the eye to such things as devils, spells, hexes, and curses, attributing human suffering and pain to punishment for sins by the devil. He could tie any disease which caused pain back to things he believed were sins. For example, his etiology for presbyopia was excessive use of alcohol. He took an interest in hot and cold witchcraft, treating patients according to which one he believed they were suffering from. It is improbable, however, that you would see any of these methods in practice today.
The majority of his knowledge was acquired from one of his 3 teachers, Abraham Meyscheider being one that he mentions specifically. After he had cultivated his abilities during his apprenticeships, he became an itinerant surgeon for the regions of Saxony, Selisia, and Bohemia. Bartisch became so well-known and respected he was appointed court oculist for Duke Augustus I of Saxony and settled in Dresden. Though he was an advocate for improving ocular health and vision, he was a huge adversary of spectacles and eye glasses. Bartisch believed that it was impossible and almost insulting to try and improve such an intricate organ’s function by sliding a piece of magnifying glass in front of it. In his theories glasses proved to weaken the patient’s vision. His treatments always stemmed from a more organic viewpoint.

George Bartisch, who is labeled the father of ophthalmology, left a huge footprint on this field by writing Ophthalmodouleia, an opthalmologic text-book. It was the first German book on ocular disease and surgery and included 92 exhaustive wood cuts. Many of these diagrams and illustrations were layered to act as flaps that could be lifted to emulate dissection, illustrating a variety of ocular diseases, surgery methodology, and instruments. Some of these you can find recreated in posters, paintings, and other reference books of the field.

Published in 1583, Ophthalmodouleia is overwhelming with ocular knowledge. Starting from the most basic concepts of head and face, it then travels to in depth illustration of eye anatomy. Bartisch demonstrates his breadth of knowledge as he addresses more complex topics such as strabismus, cataracts, external disease, and trauma, including his theories on diagnosing and treating cataracts by color. The intensive explanation of each disease is followed by the discussion of herbal remedies and prescriptions, which were popular in that time, and surgery options that easily make this book the Web MD of the ocular world for its time period.

It is an honor to have an original first edition of the actual book Ophthalmodouleia  here in our P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library. The large elegant script and illustrious drawings can penetrate any language barrier and captivate attention in appreciation of the beauty of this work. Though the original copy is printed in 16th century German dialect, the field of ophthalmology owes great appreciation to J.P. Waynebrough for publishing Donald L. Blanchard’s English translation in 1996 as part of the History of Ophthalmology series.  The Nixon Library also owns this translation.

Photographs of  our copy of Ophthalmodouleia:

 

Photograph of  Ophthalmodouleia, page 93

Photograph of Ophthalmodouleia, page 93

 

 

Photograph of Ophthalmodouleia, page 63

Photograph of Ophthalmodouleia, page 63

 

 

 

Photograph of Ophthalmodouleia, page 143

Photograph of Ophthalmodouleia, page 143

 

For more information on the Nixon Library or to set up an appointment to visit the library, contact Anne Comeaux, comeaux@uthscsa.edu or 210-567-2428 or Mellisa DeThorne, dethorne@uthscsa.edu or 210-567-2470.

 

Come take a look,
Tressica Thomas B.S., SLP-A
DEHS Student- School of Medicine

Sources:

Blanchard, Donalld. “Superstitions of George Bartisch.” Science Direct. Survey of Opthalmalogy, 1 Jan. 2005. Web. 13 Jan. 2015. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0039625705000871

“Georg Bartisch.” Whonamedit -. Ole Daniel Enerson. Web. 13 Jan. 2015.
http://www.whonamedit.com/doctor.cfm/1297.html

Mannis, Mark. “George Bartisch.” George Bartisch. American Journal of Ophthalmology. Web. 13 Jan. 2015. http://www.history-ophthalmology.com/BartischREVIEW.html

Portrait of George Bartisch courtesy of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georg_Bartisch