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The DSM-5 is here!

DSM-5The fifth edition of the APA’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) is now available through the Briscoe Library, in print and online. The print edition is located in the library’s Reserve collection and online access is available through the Psychiatry Online database.
Both versions can also be found in the library catalog.

The DSM-5 is the most definitive resource for the diagnosis and classification of mental disorders. This edition includes a revised organizational structure that strives to meet the needs of various health professionals.

For an in-depth look at the revisions made in the DSM-5, check out The Intelligent Clinician’s Guide to the DSM-5, by Joel Paris. In this book, Paris provides an evidence-based critique of DSM-5 and offers suggestions for how to get the most out of this resource.

Andrea N. Schorr
Cataloging & Acquisitions Librarian

The Libraries launch new e-books page

The UT Health Science Center Libraries announce the launch of our new e-book page. Similar to the library’s e-journal page, the new e-book page will showcase many of the e-books the library has access to and may be used for searching exclusively electronic book titles.

Currently the library has access to over 13,000 electronic books, many of which are already available through the library’s catalog.  Initially, the e-books page will feature electronic books from the following collections:

  • Ebrary – medical, nursing, and allied health collection
  • Springer – biomedical and life sciences collection and mathematics/statistics collection

Titles will be added to the e-books page on a continuous basis, so be sure to check back regularly.

The e-books page contains only a subset of all available e-book titles.  For a more complete list of titles search the library catalog.

Visit the new e-books page

Andrea N. Schorr
Cataloging & Acquisitions Librarian

A preview of the new e-books page

The Libraries remember Governor Dolph Briscoe, Jr.

Photo of Dolph BriscoeOn June 27, 2010 members of the library staff were saddened to learn of the death of former Governor Dolph Briscoe, Jr.   The UT Health Science Center library located on the Long Campus is named after Governor Briscoe.

On November 14, 1985 a ceremony was held to dedicate the  library, which was  completed in 1983 after many years of planning.  Governor Briscoe was present at the event, along with John P. Howe, III, former president of the UT Health Science Center; Donald A.B. Lindberg, Director, National Library of Medicine; and Jess Hay, Chairman, The University of Texas System Board of Regents.

An excerpt from the dedication program speaks to Governor Briscoe’s commitment to education:

The library building at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio is named to honor former Governor Dolph Briscoe, Jr.  Mr. Briscoe, Uvalde rancher, served as governor during 1973-79.  During his administration, the appropriation of funds for public and higher education increased.  Since leaving office, Governor Briscoe has been active in support of community service programs.

In announcing the dedication, the former Regents’ Chairman Jon Newton said, “No resource of any campus, whether it be academic or health-related, is of more importance than the library.  At the health science center in San Antonio, the library serves medical, dental, nursing, allied health and graduate students in the medical sciences.  It stands as a symbol of excellence in their continued quest for knowledge.”

What better honor than to dedicate a library of national distinction to an individual who has been so supportive of higher education.

From: Dolph Briscoe, Jr. Library:  Celebrating 20 Years of Service and Development,  November 14, 1985

Through the Eye Piece of the Microscope … San Antonio Nature Observations

Dr. Rudolph Menger was an early San Antonio doctor who loved nature and is best remembered for his nature observations and pictures.  He was born in San Antonio, Texas on April 21, 1851, to Johann and Augusta Menger.  His parents, native Germans, arrived in Texas in 1846. Menger attended the German-English school, a school established in 1858 by German immigrants, which endeavored to educate the children of recent immigrants. After graduation, he studied medicine in Germany at the University of Leipsic, in Saxony, graduating in November, 1874.

After graduating from medical school, Menger returned to San Antonio and served as Assistant Surgeon in the United States Army for one year then was appointed City Physician of San Antonio from 1875 until 1881, and was appointed once more in 1892. He was an active member of the West Texas Medical Society, wrote numerous articles for various medical journals, and worked in private practice.

He married Barbara C. Menger in 1879, a native of San Antonio and daughter of William L. Menger, owner of the Menger Hotel but unrelated to Ruldolph.  They had eight children: Minnie, Edward, August, Louis, Gustave, Rudolph, Theodore, and Margaret.

Dr. Menger’s book Texas Nature Observations and Reminiscenses, published in 1913, includes many of his photo-micrographs and observations.  It is available in the P. I. Nixon Medical Historical Library, and the university’s copy may be viewed online in full text through the University of North Texas’ Portal to Texas History at http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth143558/m1/1/?q=menger .

Picture from Menger book of scorpions

Picture from Menger book of scorpions

 

The P. I. Nixon Library owns the original scrapbook with Menger’s microphotographs.  It has been digitized for preservation, and the library hopes to make it viewable soon through the UTHSC Digital Archive.

Page from Menger Scrapbook

Page from Menger Scrapbook

Sources—

http://www.lib.utexas.edu/taro/drtsa/00017/00017-P.html

http://www.lib.utexas.edu/taro/uthscsa/00010/hscsa-00010.html

http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/dgm02

Thank you for taking time out of your busy schedule to read my post.  If you have a story of the early days of the Health Science Center or medicine in San Antonio to share, please send it to dethorne@uthscsa.edu or call 210-567-2470.

 

Mellisa DeThorne, keeper of precious things

Today: Wonderdrugs vs. Superbugs: Dr. Jose Cadena will speak at noon

Friends of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library Noon Lecture

Thursday, September 19

Howe Conference Room, Briscoe Library 5th Floor

At this event Jose A. Cadena Zuluaga, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine, and Medical Director, Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology for the South Texas Veterans’ Health Care System, will talk about the struggle to preserve the utility of our antibiotic arsenal.

Dr. Cadena’s lecture is the first in a three part series organized by Gregory M. Anstead, M.D., Ph.D., who is currently serving as President of the Friends group.

The noon lecture series organized by the Friends of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library provides opportunities for informal learning and conversation in the Howe Conference Room on the 5th floor of the Briscoe Library.

Everyone is invited.  Please feel free to bring your lunch.

Mark your calendar for lectures in October and November:

  • Anthony Hartzler, M.D. (October 10), Fighting fire with fire: our microbiome and the use of probiotics in the prevention and treatment of disease
  • Kirsten Gardner, Ph.D., (November 14), diabetes, presentation title to be announced

Twitter praise for P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library

 

RodriguezA232: This is the coolest library ever.  @ UTHSCSA – School Of Medicine

  http://t.co/ialgjsHv

 

 

 

 

Using the Library

UT Health Science Center Library-Downtown to close July 28

After a rich history of service to the UT Health Science Center and to University Health System (UHS), the UT Health Science Center Library-Downtown will close on July 28.  The library began as the Robert B. Green Hospital Library and continued its presence when the hospital became the Brady Green Clinic and then the University Health Center-Downtown.  The library has always focused on maintaining a collection that would be most useful for UT Health Science Center physicians and residents.  Over the years, library staff members taught many classes and consultations on using traditional library resources such as PubMed and even brought popular “Emerging Technologies Brown Bag” sessions like Medical Applications for Smart Phones and Using eBook readers  to the downtown library. The library has served as a convenient gathering place for many residents over the years as well.

As part of the UHS plans to remodel the UHC-D facility, the building housing the library will be torn down.  Although formal library space is not planned in the new facility, we will continue to provide reference services and electronic resources to faculty and staff, and we will continue to offer training opportunities and special technology programs through the cooperation of UHC-D.

Linda Levy
Assistant Director for Branch Libraries and Database Services