History of Medicine

History of Medicine lecture on November 8- Apocalypse Cow: The Strange Rise and Fortunate Decline of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

Gregory Anstead MD, PhD, Director, Immunosuppression and Infectious Disease Clinics, Veterans Healthcare System, will be the speaker at the next Noon Lecture of the Friends of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library.  He will speak on the topic, Apocalypse Cow- The Strange Rise and Fortunate Decline of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy, popularly known as Mad Cow Disease.  The Noon Lecture Series provides opportunities for informal learning and conversation. Everyone is invited.  Please feel free to bring your lunch.

For more information about the Noon Lecture Series contact Susan Hunnicutt, Special Projects Librarian, Hunnicutt@uthscsa.edu.

 

History of Medicine noon lecture will explore the treatment of diabetic pregnancy in the early 20th century

pregnancy“We Named Her Priscilla: Diabetic Pregnancy in early 20th century and Dr. Priscilla White”

Thursday, November 14, 12:00 noon
Howe Conference Room
5th floor, Briscoe Library

Kirsten Gardner, Ph.D., will talk about Priscilla White, a 1923 graduate of Tufts University Medical School whose groundbreaking work contributed to deeper understanding of diabetes, including diabetes in pregnancy.

Dr. Gardner, an Associate Professor of History at UTSA, is a past president of the Friends of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library.  Her research interests include women’s health, particularly the history of female cancers. Recent articles include “Hiding the Scars: A History of Post-Mastectomy Prostheses,” “From Cotton to Silicone: A History of Breast Prosthesis Since World War II”, and “Informing Women: Early Cancer Detection Skills.”

History of Medicine noon lectures, hosted by the Friends of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library, provide opportunities for informal learning and conversation. Everyone is invited. Please feel free to bring your lunch.

Susan Hunnicutt, Special Projects Librarian

History of Medicine presentation for March: Malaria in Central America

Panama CanalMarch 27, 6:00 pm

Howe Conference Room

5th floor, Briscoe Library

Eva Galvan, MSII and Member-at-Large for the Friends of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library, will be the presenter at the March meeting of the History of Medicine Society.  Eva will speak about  The Impact of Mosquito Control on the Building of the Panama Canal.  Everyone is invited.

The History of Medicine Society is an interest group of the Friends of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library.  Membership in the Friends is open to students, faculty and staff of the UT Health Science Center as well as members of the broader community.  For information about membership, contact Susan Hunnicutt, Special Projects Librarian, at 567-2406 or hunnicutt@uthscsa.edu.

History of Medicine Society Annual Trivia Night

Along with all of his other accomplishments, Harvey Cushing, M.D. was awarded the 1926 Pulitzer Prize for his biography of what famous physician?

William Daniels – most noted for his role as Mr. Feeny on Boy Meets World – has appeared in five medically-based television shows. Can you name them?

 Photograph of Participants at History of Medicine Society Trivia Night

Participants in the History of Medicine Society’s Second Annual Trivia Night attempted to answer these questions and more! On January 14, 2015, Ally Hertz MSIV quizzed three teams on their knowledge of medical history and medical popular culture. Six rounds of questions, as well as a halftime bonus and a final question, challenged UT Health Science Center students, faculty, retired faculty, staff, and guests.

Using some creative strategies, the Green Team came from behind to triumph on the final question by putting four significant medical advancements in the correct chronological order. Congratulations to the members of the winning team: Adelita Cantu, Ph.D., Jack Flores MSII, Eithan Kotkowski MSII, Michael “Bo” Still MSII, Becky Still, and Lisa Matye Finnie, MLS!

For more information on the activities of the History of Medicine Society, contact Lisa Matye Finnie, Special Collections Librarian, at finnie@uthscsa.edu or 210-567-2406.

Answers:

Harvey Cushing, M.D. was awarded the 1926 Pulitzer Prize for his book entitled The Life of Sir William Osler.

William Daniels has appeared in Grey’s Anatomy, Scrubs, St. Elsewhere, Trapper John, M.D., and Quincy, M.E.

History of Medicine Society Draws Record Attendance

Sixty history of medicine enthusiasts attended the September 16th meeting of the History of Medicine Society, a student-led interest group of the Friends of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library. Charleen Moore, PhD, Distinguished Teaching Professor in the Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, presented Potent Potions and Healing Herbs: Medicinal Practices of the Renaissance. The Garden Health Interest Group provided Harry Potter themed snacks, including Snitch cake pops, chocolate pretzel wands, and “Butter Beer” topped with whipped cream!

Dr. Charleen Moore presents

Following the presentation, attendees adjourned to the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library to view some of the books referenced in Dr. Moore’s talk, as well as some historical herbals with magnificent illustrations.

Student views historical medical book

For more information about the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library or the History of Medicine Society, contact Lisa Matye Finnie, Special Collections Librarian, at finnie@uthscsa.edu or 210-567-2406.

History of Medicine Society will hold organizational meeting October 3

Illustration of a fly’s eye from Robert Hooke’s Micrographia (1665), collection of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library. The Micrographia is one of the books that will be featured in Dr. Charleen Moore’s presentation on some of the treasures of the Nixon library.

A new organization is being formed at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. The History of Medicine Society will provide a relaxed, interactive setting, with opportunities to discuss interesting stories of our predecessors as enrichment to our scientific and medical endeavors.  Membership will be open to students, faculty, and staff from all schools at UT Health Science Center, as well as from local undergraduate institutions.

Everyone is invited to learn more at the group’s introductory meeting, which will be held October 3, 2012 at 6:00 pm in the Howe Conference Room, 5th floor, Briscoe Library next to the Special Collections Reading Room.

For the group’s first program, Dr. Charleen Moore from the Department of Cellular and Structural Biology will speak about some of the rare book treasures of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library.  Among the books she will discuss that will be on display following her presentation are:

Oldest book in the Nixon library

1481 Celsus, De Medicina, Roman medicine

Anatomy

1543 A. Vesalius, De Fabrica

1597 (1924 facsimile) Ketham, The fasciculus medicinae

1749 B. Albinus, Tables of Skeleton and Muscles

Natural History

1859 C. Darwin On the Origin of Species (1st edition)

Dentistry

1778 J. Hunter, Natural History of Human Teeth

General Medicine

1582 Avicenna, Canon of Medicine

Microscopy

1667 R. Hooke, Micrographia

Obstetrics/Gynecology

1851 J. Hunter, The Gravid Uterus

Ophthalmology

1583 G. Bartisch, Ophthalmodouleia (1st edition)

Nursing

1859 F. Nightingale, Notes on Nursing (1st edition)

Surgery

1821 C. Bell, Illustrations of the Great Operations of Surgery

Psychiatry

1632 Burton Anatomy of Melancholy – oldest printed book in English

Botany/Pharmacology

1785 W. Withering, An Account of the Foxglove (1st edition)

Early San Antonio and Texas

1853 G. Cupples, Case Books (one of San Antonio’s early physicians)

1936 P.I. Nixon, A Century of Medicine in San Antonio

1946 P.I. Nixon, The Medical Story of Early Texas

Newest  Addition

1801, 1806, 1808 J. Bell, The Principles of Surgery (3 vol. 1st editions)

 

An RSVP will be appreciated. For more information or to RSVP, please contact one of the individuals below.

Suzanne Thibodeaux, MS-4, thibodeauxs@livemail.uthscsa.edu

Daniel Barron, GS-2, barrond@livemail.uthscsa.edu

Lindsey Jackson, MS-4, jacksonla@livemail.uthscsa.edu

Dr. Charleen Moore, Faculty Advisor, moorec@uthscsa.edu
 

History of the Health Sciences Scavenger Hunt

Discover Hidden Treasures in the Briscoe Library!

Photograph of a wooden treasure chest with jewelsThe History of Medicine Society is sponsoring a treasure hunt for anyone interested in the history of the health sciences. The scavenger hunt will run from Tuesday, September 1 at 8:00 am through Wednesday, September 16 at 6:30 pm. Any time during that period, participants can pick up an entry form at the Circulation Desk on the 3rd floor of the Briscoe Library or in the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library on the 5th floor. Uncover treasures located throughout the building and even online! See an ancient Roman coin, examine rare historical books, and view World War I posters.

Deadline

All forms must be returned to the Circulation Desk or to Nixon Library staff by 6:30 pm on Wednesday, September 16.

Prizes

Participants must answer 8 out of 10 questions correctly to be eligible for a prize. All qualifying entrants may enter a drawing to win novelty chocolates, and student entrants are eligible for one of five $5 gift cards to Starbucks! Winners will be drawn at the September 16 meeting of the History of Medicine Society. Charleen Moore, Ph.D. and members of the Garden Health Interest Group will present Potent Potions and Healing Herbs: Medicinal Practices of the Renaissance at 6:00 pm in the Howe Conference Room.

For more information, contact Lisa Matye Finnie, Special Collections Librarian, at 210-567-2406 or finnie@uthscsa.edu.

Illustrator for the Netter Collection of Medical Illustrations to speak April 10

Dr.-Carlos-MachadoWednesday, April 10

6:00 pm

Howe Conference Room, Briscoe Library

Dr. Carlos Machado, physician and artist for The Netter Collection of Medical Illustrations, will speak to the History of Medicine Society of the Friends of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library on April 10, 2013 at 6:00 p.m. in the evening.  Dr. Machado will speak on the topic: Converging Paths: The Styles of Netter and Machado.

An exhibit, The Artistic Style of Carlos Machado, MD: Selected Illustrations from the Netter Art Collection, is currently on display on the third floor of the Briscoe Library.  The exhibit is on loan from NetterImages.com, ©Elsevier.

Before his artistic talents took his career in a different direction, Dr. Machado practiced medicine as a cardiologist in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. His skill in medical illustration came to the attention of Ciba-Geigy, which at that time controlled the illustration work initiated by Dr. Frank H. Netter.  Dr. Machado has contributed to the Netter Collection of Medical Illustrations for nineteen years, working first for Ciba-Geigy/Novartis, then Icon, and finally Elsevier. He has added over 1,000 new illustrations to the collection, and also updated many of the Netter images to reflect current medical practice and knowledge.

As part of his talk on April 10, Dr. Machado will discuss how his technique has evolved over time, and the factors that influenced his development as an artist. He will discuss his experience working in various media, and comment on similarities and differences between his and Dr. Netter’s professional training, styles, and particular techniques.

Dr. Machado received his medical degree at the Faculdade Medicina de Teresopolis, and his postgraduate degree in cardiology from Santa Casa de Misericordia in Rio de Janeiro.  His illustrations can be seen in Clinical Symposia, The Netter Collection of Medical Illustrations, and the highly acclaimed Interactive Atlas of Clinical Anatomy.

The Netter Presenter database, which contains images from Netter: Atlas of Human Anatomy 5th Edition, can be accessed online through the database page on the library’s website.

Other Netter anatomical resources, including print resources, can be found by searching with the keyword “Netter” in the library’s online catalog.

Susan Hunnicutt, Special Projects Librarian

In the history of medicine — Early ophthalmology text turns 500 this year

First page of treatise "De oculis" from Champier's _Speculum Galeni_

The first page of the treatise "De oculis" from Symphorien Champier's _Speculum Galeni_ (Lyon, 1512)

The P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library is celebrating the 500th birthday of one of its treasures, an edition of Symphorien Champier’s Speculum Galeni.  The book includes one of the first treatises on ophthalmology ever printed.

Symphorien Champier (1472-1539) was an early French humanist and physician to Charles VIII, Louis XII, and the Duke of Lorraine.  He settled in Lyon, where he established the College of the Doctors of Lyon and studied Greek and Arab scholars, as well as medicinal science, composing a great number of historical works.   He was also an admirer of Galen, the great second-century Greek physician and philosopher.  Champier set out to expand his contemporary colleagues’ knowledge of Galen by using a powerful new tool: the printing press.  

Speculum Galeni, printed in Lyon in 1512, begins with Champier’s own biography of Galen and a list of Galenic works.  It continues with Champier’s careful compilation of Latin translations of key works that were (at that time) attributed to Galen, to form a complete Treatise of Medicine.  Included in the compilation is “De oculis,” a treatise on the eyes, the first page of which appears in the photo above. According to later historians, “De oculis” may not have been Galen’s at all — it is only known today from this Latin translation, and no Greek original has ever been found.  Nonetheless, its inclusion in Champier’s compilation makes it one of the first printed works on the subject of ophthalmology.

Our copy of Speculum Galeni is bound together with another work of Champier called Practica nova in medicina which was probably printed several years earlier, around 1509. The beautiful binding was also created around the same time; it is stamped pigskin over wooden boards with metal clasp closures.  The whole volume is in beautiful condition.

Photo of cover of our copy of Champier's book

The handcrafted early-16th-century cover of Champier's book.

We know from the stamps and inscriptions in the book that it once belonged to the Strahov Monastery Library in Prague.

Speculum Galeni came to the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library as part of the Andrew A. Sandor Ophthalmology collection, a group of some 400 rare and historical books that the library acquired in 1988. We invite you to come and see this historical treasure, along with many other treasures on the history of ophthalmology such as Georg Bartisch’s Ophthalmodouleia (1583) and Samuel Thomas Sommering’s Abbildungen des menschlichen Auges (1801).

The P. I. Nixon Medical Historical Library Reading Room is located on the fifth floor of the Briscoe Library and is open Monday-Friday, 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.  In order to view books in the collection, it is best to schedule an appointment prior to visiting by calling 567-2470.

Luke Rosenberger, Director of Library Technology and Historical Collections

Library Says Goodbye to Trinae Weldy, Archives Intern

The UTHSCSA Libraries have sponsored numerous undergraduate and graduate students over the years as interns.

Trinae Weldy, Library Archives Intern

Trinae Weldy, Library Archives Intern

These interns worked on various projects to gain experience in library operations, information services, systems, records management, or archives and historical collections while earning college credit at the same time.

Trinae Weldy, a graduate student in the History Department at the University of Texas at San Antonio, has worked for two semesters as an intern in Special Collections at the Briscoe Library.  During this time she has completed many projects that have made materials in the University Archives and the P. I. Nixon Medical Historical Library more accessible to researchers, faculty, and students.  She added four interesting entries to the Treasures of the P. I. Nixon Medical Historical Library blog to highlight rare books and medical instruments in the collections including:

Trinae also identified numerous antique medical instruments in the Special Collections and scanned newspaper clippings about the university from 1995, 1996, and 1999 for preservation and to enable keyword searching.  She scanned the 2011 Medical School Yearbook for future addition to the Digital Archive’s University History Project and created an exhibit on antique obstetric and gynecological instruments, which is displayed in front of the Nixon Library.  Trinae helped inventory the rare books in the Nixon Library and worked to organize the negatives, proof sheets, and photographic prints in the University Archives from Academic Technology Services.

Trinae is graduating in May.  We wish her luck in her search for an archival position.  Thank you, Trinae for all of your hard work.