Treasures of the PI Nixon Library Blog

Treasures of the P.I. Nixon

Scavenger Hunt: Discover Hidden Treasures in the Briscoe Library!

TreasureBox

The History of Medicine Society is sponsoring a treasure hunt for anyone interested in the history of the health sciences. The scavenger hunt will run from Tuesday, September 6 at 8:00 am through Thursday, September 15 at 6:00 pm. Any time during that period, participants can pick up an entry form at the Circulation Desk on the 3rd floor of the Briscoe Library. Uncover treasures located throughout the building and even online! See rare historical books, and view digital collections.

Deadline

Completed forms should be placed in the designated boxes at the Circulation Desk on the 3rd floor or in the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library on the 5th floor by 6:00 pm on Thursday, September 15.

Prizes

Participants must answer 8 out of 10 questions correctly to be eligible for a prize. All qualifying entrants may enter a drawing to win novelty chocolates, and student entrants are eligible for one of three $5 gift cards to Starbucks! Winners will be drawn at the September 15 meeting of the History of Medicine Society. Walter Humann, MS III and winner of the 2015 Danny Jones History of the Health Sciences Student Essay Contest, will present Medical Progress in the West: A Historical Perspective at 6:00 pm in the Howe Conference Room.

For more information, contact Peg Seger, Head of Outreach and Community Engagement, at 210-567-6398 or segerp@uthscsa.edu.

 

 

 

 

 

 

August 2016 Historical Book of the Month

The August 2016 Historical Book of the Month highlights the oldest resource in the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library, De Medicina, published in Milan in 1481.

Image of book: De Medicina by Celsus

Aulus Cornelius Celsus was a first-century Roman historian who compiled this set of treatises as a home health reference for wealthy Patrician families. It includes principles of good surgery, dental practices, proper diet, and herbal remedies. De Medicina was rediscovered in the late Middle Ages and chosen as one of the first medical texts to be set in type.

For more information on the collections of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library, contact Andrea Schorr, Head of Collection Resources, at schorr@uthscsa.edu or 210-567-2403.

July 2016 Historical Book of the Month

Skeleton image from Osteographia by Cheselden

This month’s featured historical treasure is Osteographia, or The Anatomy of the Bones by William Cheselden. Published in London in 1753, this exquisite volume includes depictions of human and animal skeletons in interesting vignettes and in lifelike poses. His artists, Gerard van der Gucht and Jacob Schijnvoet, were the first to use the camera obscura to create more accurate engravings for book illustration.

For more information on the collections of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library, contact Andrea Schorr, Head of Collection Resources, at schorr@uthscsa.edu or 210-567-2403.

June 2016 Historical Book of the Month

Image scanned from Charles Bell's Illustrations of the Great Operations of Surgery

The June 2016 Historical Book of the Month features the artistic masterpiece, Illustrations of the Great Operations  of Surgery: Trepan, Hernia, Amputation, Aneurism, and Lithotomy by Charles Bell published in London in 1821. Sir Charles Bell was a Scottish surgeon, neurologist, and anatomist and namesake of such structures and phenomena as Bell’s Nerve, Bell’s Palsy, and Bell’s Spasm. This classic work in the history of surgery includes 20 engraved plates of Charles Bell’s own drawings of operations he performed over the course of 20 years.

For more information on the collections of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library, contact Andrea Schorr, Head of Collection Resources, at schorr@uthscsa.edu or 210-567-2403.

May 2016 Historical Book of the Month

Image from De Symmetria Partium in Rectis Formis Humanorum Corporum

This month’s highlighted historical book from the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library is De Symmetria Partium in Rectis Formis Humanorum Corporum by Albrecht Dürer. This 1st Latin edition was translated from the original 1528 German edition and published in Nuremberg in 1532.

Dürer was an influential artist, renowned print-maker, and respected contributor to the Northern Renaissance. This classic work includes 85 full-length figures of the human body that celebrate its mathematical proportions and aesthetic symmetry.

For more information on the collections of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library, contact Lisa Matye Finnie, Special Collections Librarian, at finnie@uthscsa.edu or 210-567-2406.

April 2016 Historical Book of the Month

Image of blackberry from American Medical Botany

In honor of Earth Day, this month’s chosen resource is Jacob Bigelow’s American Medical Botany, a 3-volume set published between 1817 and 1820 and one of the first titles published in the United States containing colored plant illustrations.

Sixty beautiful colored plates were produced using a special process invented by Bigelow himself. Each entry includes a plant’s botanical history, chemical examination, medicinal uses, and dissections of the flower and fruit from the plant.

For more information on the collections of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library, contact Lisa Matye Finnie, Special Collections Librarian, at finnie@uthscsa.edu or 210-567-2406.

March 2016 Historical Book of the Month

The March 2016 Historical Book of the Month features this monumental work by Giovanni Battista Morgagni.

Image of Giovanni Morgagni

  • De Sedibus, et Causis Morborum per Anatomen Indagatis Libri Quinque
    • 2nd edition
    • Published in Padua in 1765
  • The Seats and Causes of Diseases Investigated by Anatomy: In Five Books
    • 1st English edition
    • Published in London in 1769

Considered the Father of Pathological Anatomy, Morgagni confirmed the relationship between symptoms of disease and pathological changes in specific organs. He systematically indexed almost 700 postmortem examinations correlating the autopsy findings with the patient’s symptoms, or the cry of the suffering organs.

For more information on the collections of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library, contact Lisa Matye Finnie, Special Collections Librarian, at finnie@uthscsa.edu or 210-567-2406.

February 2016 Historical Book of the Month

Illustration of Skull Measuring

This month’s featured historical book is Coomb’s Popular Phrenology by Frederick Coombs published in Boston in 1841. This monograph contains charts and illustrations of the exact phrenological – or skull – measurements of over fifty people. Phrenologists believed that each personality trait and mental faculty is represented in a specific area of the brain and that the size of the skull over that area determines the capacity for that attribute. By feeling the contours, bumps, and fissures of the skull, they claimed to be able to determine a person’s character and intellect.

For more information on the collections of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library, contact Lisa Matye Finnie, Special Collections Librarian, at finnie@uthscsa.edu or 210-567-2406.

January 2016 Historical Book of the Month

Portrait of Robert BoyleThe January 2016 Historical Book of the Month is Medicinal Experiments: or, A Collection of Choice Remedies, for the Most Part Simple and Easily Prepared, a collection of medicinal recipes compiled by Robert Boyle and published posthumously in London in 1692. Namesake of Boyle’s Law, Robert Boyle was one of the founders of modern chemistry, but his interests were widespread, including philosophy and theology. In this pocket-sized monograph, measuring 3 1/2″ x 5 1/2″, Boyle offers instructions for making concoctions to treat such varied ailments as jaundice, toothache, and convulsions in children, classifying each formula as an A, B, or C.

For more information on the collections of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library, contact Lisa Matye Finnie, Special Collections Librarian, at finnie@uthscsa.edu or 210-567-2406.

December 2015 Historical Book of the Month

Portrait of Thomas Robert MalthusThis month’s highlighted resource from the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library is An Essay on the Principle of Population as it Affects the Future Improvement of Society written under a pseudonym by Thomas Robert Malthus in 1798. In this statistical classic, Malthus concludes that population increases exponentially while the food supply only increases arithmetically, leading him to advocate for population control and moral restraint. The work of Thomas Robert Malthus is credited with suggesting to Charles Darwin the concept of “Survival of the Fittest.”

For more information on the collections of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library, contact Lisa Matye Finnie, Special Collections Librarian, at finnie@uthscsa.edu or 210-567-2406.