Event Announcement

2nd Annual Image of Research Winners and Awards Reception

We are pleased to announce the winners of Briscoe Library’s 2nd Annual Image of Research Photography Competition!

1st Place
Kristina Andrijauskaite, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

Winter’s Tale
This picture depicts zebrafish embryo which travels across the crystallized well of the tissue culture plate. There are different animal models used in scientific research. However, zebrafish have many advantages, such as its rapid development, transparency and suitability for in vivo imaging. I use zebrafish to study microgravity induced alterations on vascularization and stress responses. First, I expose them to simulated gravity and then I spend numerous hours looking at them under the microscope and uncovering the world of imagination. I believe you do not have to travel thousands of miles to capture magnificent winter images; as they can be discovered by looking through the microscope lenses in the UTHSCSA lab.

2nd Place
Elliott Moss & Alexander Hutchinson, Long School of Medicine

Hear a Murmur, Save a Life
Cardiac murmurs are found in 1-3% of newborns. Of those with a murmur, as many as half are associated with some degree of congenital anomaly of the heart. With modern day management, babies born with congenital heart defects live to adulthood about 95% of the time. Untreated, congenital heart defects are one of the leading causes of mortality in newborns. These facts help underlie the truth that detecting a murmur and deciding on a correct management plan is a vital part of caring for a neonate as a pediatrician. Unfortunately, there currently is no standardized protocol for the assessment and management of a neonatal murmur. All management decisions are made simply based on the pediatrician’s experience and intuition. Our team is working with the Pediatric Cardiology department of UT Health to implement and refine a standardized protocol for how to proceed when a murmur is auscultated in a neonatal patient by one of our pediatricians. We hope to improve neonatal health outcomes, prevent both insufficient and excessive testing, and help ease the decision-making burden on the pediatricians.

3rd Place
Breeanne Soteros, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

La Reazione Nera
The precise organization of synapses in the brain anatomically define and link the neural circuits that give rise to all our thoughts, emotions and behaviors. At every moment, synapses are formed and restructured with incredible specificity in response to each of our experiences. Our research seeks to understand the molecular mechanisms which enable the specificity of these synaptic events. We utilize various molecular, cellular and behavioral approaches to delineate the genes that govern synapse formation, maintenance and elimination in the central nervous system.

Pictured here, we see the beautifully complex structure of a Purkinje cell – made possible by “la reazione nera” (the black reaction) – a stain invented in the 1870s by the late scientist Camillo Golgi. Golgi’s stain enables the visualization of dendritic spines – fine protrusions along the dendrite where excitatory synapses occur. By use of genetic manipulation and Golgi staining, we can begin to tease apart the genes that shape the synaptic landscape throughout the lifespan.

IPE Award
Kunal Baxi (Cancer Biology), Nicole Hensch (IBMS – Cell Biology, Genetics & Molecular Medicine), and Amanda Lipsitt (Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Clinical Fellow)

Glow Fish Glow
This image shows a 5 day old zebrafish embryo that has been genetically modified to express red, blue, and yellow fluorescent proteins from a transgenic cassette (Brainbow). The gene encoding each fluorescent protein is flanked by two pairs of lox sites that are recognized by the Cre recombinase. Without Cre-induced recombination, the first protein (red) in the array will be expressed. Cre expression results in one of three outcomes: red (no recombination), blue (recombination event 1), or yellow (recombination event 2). When additional copies of the Brainbow cassette are inserted into a cell, these three primary colors can be mixed, thereby increasing possible color combinations. This diversity of color using a single promoter provides a powerful platform for studying a variety of biological processes such as neuronal morphology and cell lineage tracking. We use this system as a tool to study heterogeneity of cells within a soft tissue tumor (rhabdomyosarcoma) using zebrafish as a model system.

 

Briscoe Library’s 2nd Annual Image of Research Photography Competition came to a close with an awards reception during the library’s Fiesta Celebration on Thursday, April 11th. All entrants, Image of Research Judges, contest sponsors, students, faculty, and staff were invited to come view the entries, meet the winners, and enjoy refreshments.

2nd Annual Student Appreciation Week Success

Please enjoy a few pictures from the week long activities during the 2018 Student Appreciation Week, October 29th through November 2nd, 2018.

SGA Secretary Samantha Yee and Vice-President Mustafa Mithaiwala cut the ribbon at a celebration for the new Library food vending area made possible by funds from the Student Fee Fund. (10/29/18)

Students enjoying coffee and cake at the ribbon cutting celebration. (10/29/18)

Library Liaisons Karen Barton (SHP), Chris Gaspard (SOM), and Christy Tyson (SOD) prepare for the student paint party complete with spooky drinks and pumpkin cookies.

(10/30/18)

Students enjoy spooky drinks and treats with Liaison Librarian Christy Tyson. (10/30/18)

Students talk with Miguel Vazquez, M.D., creator of Starletta. (10/30/18)

Students line up to take part in the Student Photo Wall. The School of Health Professions was the winner with the most participation! (10/30/18)

Students getting pictures taken at the Halloween Photo Wall (10/31/18).

Students getting to know Library therapy dogs June and Angel along with handlers, Resource Management Librarians Dana Whitmire and Andrea Schorr. (11/2/18)

Students lined up each day to spin the wheel for prizes.


Student wins a prize!

Annual P.I. Nixon Dinner Draws a Crowd

 

The message to the 120 attendees of the 48th Annual Friends of the Nixon Medical Historical Library Dinner this year (on Friday October 26th) was that, yes, sugar is bad for you. Author Gary Taubes, award-winning science and health journalist, shared an historical account of the tracking of diabetes rates and made a convincing case that sugar is the tobacco of the new millennium. This did not, however, keep some of those in attendance from eating their dessert.

The subject, though lighthearted at times, bears undeniably serious considerations for the role of diet and nutrition in the health of our U.S. population as well as the health of our healthcare system. Outgoing President of the Friends, Eithan Kotkowski, was on hand to introduce Mr. Taubes and pass the gavel on to incoming Friends President, Dr. Anand Karnad. Mr. Kotkowski has also written a more detailed account of Mr. Taube’s work in an article for The Pipette Gazette.

Author Gary Taubes to Speak at 48th Annual Friends of the P.I. Nixon Medical Historical Library Dinner

Gary Taubes is the co-founder and senior scientific advisor of the Nutrition Science Initiative (NuSI). He’s an award-winning science and health journalist, the author of Why We Get Fat and Good Calories, Bad Calories, and a former staff writer for Discover and correspondent for the journal Science. His newest book, The Case Against Sugar, was published in 2016. His writing has also appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The Atlantic, and Esquire, and has been included in numerous Best of anthologies, including The Best of the Best American Science Writing (2010). He has received three Science in Society Journalism Awards from the National Association of Science Writers. He is also the recipient of a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Investigator Award in Health Policy Research.

The dinner will be held this year on Friday, October 26th, at the San Antonio Food Bank, Valero Community Engagement Center, 5200 Enrique M. Barrera Pkwy. The cost is $55 per person, $35 for students. Paid sponsorships for students are available on request. Advance registration is required. RSVP no later than Monday, October 15th. For more information, please contact Peg Seger at segerp@uthscsa.edu.

Sponsored by San Antonio Science, Mr. Taubes will also provide a special student talk on Friday, October 26th, in room 3.304 in the AltC from 2-3 p.m. For more information, please contact Eithan Kotkowski at Kotkowski@livemail.uthscsa.edu.

 

Briscoe Buddies – February 14

Stressed and need puppy love? Come see June and Angel, Briscoe Library’s own therapy dogs on Friday, February 14, 2020. They will be on the 5th floor, right outside the P.I. Nixon Historical Library.

Don’t worry if you can’t make this visit, Briscoe Buddies will be a monthly occurrence at the library. See our event calendar for future sessions.

June and Angel are certified therapy dogs and are available for other campus visits. For more information on booking the Briscoe Buddies library therapy dog team for your event, contact Andrea Schorr at 210-567-2440/schorr@uthscsa.edu or Dana Whitmire at 210-567-2464/whitmired@uthscsa.edu.

 

Briscoe Library Announces 3rd Annual Image of Research Photography Competition

Briscoe Library is pleased to announce its 3rd Annual Image of Research Photography Competition! This competition is an opportunity for UT Health San Antonio students, faculty, and staff from all five schools to capture, share, and present the essence of their research in a single visual image. The competition and its accompanying exhibition showcase the UT Health San Antonio community’s creative visual conceptualization of their research.

This is the first year that faculty and staff are invited to participate, and we are excited to see your contributions. Submissions will be accepted from December 1st, 2019 through March 13th, 2020. The awards are listed as follows:
1st Place: $400
2nd Place: $300
3rd Place: $200
IPE Award: $600
Faculty/Staff Award: $400

Visit library.uthscsa.edu/2019/11/ior2020 for more info.

Briscoe Library to Partner with SAPL on NPR Campus Community Book Club

DoNoHarm

NPRBookClubLogo

The UT Health Science Center Briscoe Library and the San Antonio Public Library Forest Hills Branch are joining forces to start a new NPR (National Public Radio) Book Club as a community engagement project. There are many community issues that can benefit from engagement utilizing a book club as a platform for interaction and conversation. The club will meet once a month from 6:00 to 7:00 p.m. at either the Briscoe Library (room 4.074, the Collaboratory) or at the Forest Hills Library (5245 Ingram Rd). An NPR reviewed book will be featured at each meeting.

Do No Harm by Henry Marsh has been selected for the first meeting on September 17th, 6 -7 p.m., held at the Briscoe Library.

Do No Harm provides unforgettable insight into the countless human dramas that take place in a busy modern hospital.  Above all, it is a lesson in the need for hope when faced with life’s most difficult decisions.

A few copies are available at the Briscoe Library on a first come, first served basis. Other copies are available through the San Antonio Public Library. Contact Peg Seger for more details at (210) 567-6398 or segerp@uthscsa.edu.

Those interested in taking part in this project can stop by either library to pick up a bookmark with dates, times, and location information.

 

Coming to the Library: Before I Die Interactive Art Wall, May 8 – 16

Candy Chang is an artist who has made an international impact with her reflective, public art projects.  She is probably most famous for her Before I Die walls which have been featured in major cities all over the world.  While the architecture of each wall is slightly different the concept is simple: a wall of wood, paper, or concrete is painted black and then stenciled with the prompt “before I die I want to…”. 

In conjunction with the community viewing of the FRONTLINE special on Atul Gwande’s Being Mortal on Tuesday May 16 in the Pestana Lecture Hall,  a Before I Die wall will be placed on display in the library to stir UT Health San Antonio and the broader community to participate in an open discussion on the meaning of life.

The library wall will consist of black butcher paper on large poster board displays.  The paper will have the prompt “before I die I want to…” in white. Visitors to the library wall will be encouraged to use provided chalk to publicly engage in the contemplation of life and death.

For more information about the “Before I Die” project and photos of these walls from around the world, please visit: http://candychang.com/work/before-i-die-in-nola/

 

Image of Research – New Faculty/Staff Award

Briscoe Library’s 3rd Annual Image of Research Photography Competition will be taking place again in Spring 2020. As with the previous two years, awards will be presented for 1st Place, 2nd Place, 3rd Place, and an IPE (Interprofessional Education) category. However, this year we are introducing a new award category! For the first time, UT Health faculty and staff will be invited to submit a photo for consideration for the Image of Research Faculty/Staff Award.

Stay tuned for more details in the coming months. In the meantime, please visit Briscoe Library to view our new exhibit featuring the winners from the previous two years’ Image of Research competitions.

Image of Research Exhibit and Awards Reception

Briscoe Library’s Image of Research Photography Competition received a number of outstanding entries from UT Health San Antonio students. We welcome you to come view all of the submissions in our Image of Research Exhibit located on the newly completed gallery wall at the entrance of the library.

The library will be holding the Image of Research Awards Reception during Student Appreciation Week on Thursday, November 1st from 2pm to 3pm. All are welcome!

Please stay tuned for announcement of the winners in mid-October.