Library Updates

2015 Possible Journal Cancellations

Similar to other departments across campus and other libraries across the nation, the UTHSC Libraries must reduce some of our expenditures in order to stay within budget.  Below is our tentative journal cancellation list for 2015.  The titles on this list have low usage (less than 100 uses during the year), no usage, or we could not obtain usage statistics from the publisher.

Librarians do not make cancellations lightly and one factor is comments from faculty, staff, and students. If you would like to request any of these resources be kept, send your comments to John Weed, Head of Collection Resources, at weedj@uthscsa.edu.

2020 Image of Research Winners

We are pleased to announce the winners of Briscoe Library’s 3rd Annual Image of Research Photography Competition!

1st Place
Breeanne Soteros, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

Cortical Maps
Flattened cortical brain sections stained for glutamate transporter VGlut2 reveals the somatotopic organization of the mouse barrel cortex. Each “barrel” (in blue) corresponds to the major facial whiskers of the mouse, with the topographical organization of the cortex closely resembling the whisker pad itself. Co-staining for the immune protein C1q (in orange) reveals an unexpected pattern – this complement cascade molecule appears to decorate the borders of each barrel. In the human brain, the complement protein C1q is important for shaping the synaptic landscape, as it tags synapses for elimination. Could this immune help define these barrels by eliminating excess synapses at the border? What might this pattern of staining reveal about the ongoing synaptic maintenance of sensory circuits in the brain? Through a combination of genetic and molecular techniques, we hope to tease out the mechanisms of synapse maintenance & elimination that govern the organization of both the mouse and human brain.

2nd Place
Pragya Singh, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

When Your Cells Can Reborn Again!
It was early 2018 I had a breathtaking moment when I first saw iPSC clones during my Master’s research here in UTHSA. I was reprogramming fibroblast into stem cell-like cells known as induced Pluripotent Stem Cells or iPSCs. These iPSC clones are so malleable that you can influence any cellular fate you wish to generate. This pristine clone was further induced to generate Retinal Ganglion Cells to understand the molecular mechanism of Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy, a rare genetic disease that leads to vision loss.

3rd Place
Sonam Khurana, School of Dentistry

3D Dummy Corpse
This three-dimensional (3-D) animation you are seeing is depicting nerve and blood supply to the teeth. The model is a complicated piece of art, requiring lots of practice and skills to be produced. 3-D animation has been used in entertainment industry (like in movie theaters!) to create a range of exciting videos, short cartoons and full-length videos. The health care industry also uses 3-D animations create models that everyone can examine. The use of anatomical models is ubiquitous in health education. Realistic looking models allow the user to move away from complex cadaveric dissection, which is not a readily available resource any way. Models are very useful to explain anatomical relationships and function in structures that may be too small to discern adequately in a cadaver. Learning anatomy is challenging, and an adaptation of new methods that are user-friendly is essential. We hope that our research based on creating anatomical models will help the transition from dissection to the use of 3-D animations. It will not only help health professionals to learn anatomy nimbly, but also offer them a tool that is easy to show and explain to their patients. Let the journey begin!

IPE Award
Rafael Veraza (Anesthesiology), Jaclyn Merlo (Immunology and Infection), and Kristina Andrijauskaite (Molecular Medicine)

The BLUE Heart
This combined image consists of ischemic cardiac pig muscles overlaid with a blood vessel. The tissue was removed and stained from an ischemic heart placed in cold storage; the traditional method of heart preservation for transplantation. Our aim is to extend organ tissue preservation beyond the time constraint of 4 hours via novel biomedical devices. This will increase the viability of organs for transplantation beyond the current standard of care. The BLUE heart represents the lack of time in the field of tissue preservation. BLUE encompasses our limitations on delivering a warm RED heart to a transplant recipient. Our multidisciplinary group preserves tissues of the heart, colon, and limbs for periods of 24 to 48 hours outside of the body and studies hypoxia makers to further improve transplant outcomes.

Faculty/Staff Award
Sang Hyun (Ryan) Chun, Research Associate, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

The Stars in Our Brain After Traumatic Brain Injury
Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) has been garnering attention as one of the most prevalent neuropathogenesis. Injuries occurring from sports related activities, wars, and domestic violence are the few examples of many TBI related incidents. The underlying mechanism of TBI and its therapeutic intervention have been poorly defined and must be addressed. Astrocytes have been regarded as a key agent in maintaining brain homeostasis. Astrocytes are the most abundant glial cells in our central nervous system. As the name implies, astrocytes are known for having a star shaped characteristic in the brain. In addition to sustaining brain homeostasis, astrocytes have shown key neuroprotective role after TBI. After injury, the astrocytes undergo what is known as astrogliosis in which morphological and molecular changes occur. In our study, we use cytoskeletal protein called glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) as a biomarker to look at how the astrocytes function after the injury. The image is displaying a cortical region of the mouse brain after TBI. GFAP labeled astrocytes and nuclei are shown in green and blue, respectively. This image captures how the brain tries to react to the injury by undergoing astrogliosis and the enlarged astrocytic “stars” are being activated as a neuroprotective measure.

All of the submissions that Briscoe Library received were very impressive. The photos were all scored based on visual impact, connection between image and research, and originality by our multidisciplinary panel of judges. While we had initially planned on having an Image of Research Awards Reception this Spring, the reception has been postponed. Please stay tuned for updates.

Click here for more information regarding the competition rules, guidelines, and details.

2nd Annual Image of Research Winners and Awards Reception

We are pleased to announce the winners of Briscoe Library’s 2nd Annual Image of Research Photography Competition!

1st Place
Kristina Andrijauskaite, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

Winter’s Tale
This picture depicts zebrafish embryo which travels across the crystallized well of the tissue culture plate. There are different animal models used in scientific research. However, zebrafish have many advantages, such as its rapid development, transparency and suitability for in vivo imaging. I use zebrafish to study microgravity induced alterations on vascularization and stress responses. First, I expose them to simulated gravity and then I spend numerous hours looking at them under the microscope and uncovering the world of imagination. I believe you do not have to travel thousands of miles to capture magnificent winter images; as they can be discovered by looking through the microscope lenses in the UTHSCSA lab.

2nd Place
Elliott Moss & Alexander Hutchinson, Long School of Medicine

Hear a Murmur, Save a Life
Cardiac murmurs are found in 1-3% of newborns. Of those with a murmur, as many as half are associated with some degree of congenital anomaly of the heart. With modern day management, babies born with congenital heart defects live to adulthood about 95% of the time. Untreated, congenital heart defects are one of the leading causes of mortality in newborns. These facts help underlie the truth that detecting a murmur and deciding on a correct management plan is a vital part of caring for a neonate as a pediatrician. Unfortunately, there currently is no standardized protocol for the assessment and management of a neonatal murmur. All management decisions are made simply based on the pediatrician’s experience and intuition. Our team is working with the Pediatric Cardiology department of UT Health to implement and refine a standardized protocol for how to proceed when a murmur is auscultated in a neonatal patient by one of our pediatricians. We hope to improve neonatal health outcomes, prevent both insufficient and excessive testing, and help ease the decision-making burden on the pediatricians.

3rd Place
Breeanne Soteros, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

La Reazione Nera
The precise organization of synapses in the brain anatomically define and link the neural circuits that give rise to all our thoughts, emotions and behaviors. At every moment, synapses are formed and restructured with incredible specificity in response to each of our experiences. Our research seeks to understand the molecular mechanisms which enable the specificity of these synaptic events. We utilize various molecular, cellular and behavioral approaches to delineate the genes that govern synapse formation, maintenance and elimination in the central nervous system.

Pictured here, we see the beautifully complex structure of a Purkinje cell – made possible by “la reazione nera” (the black reaction) – a stain invented in the 1870s by the late scientist Camillo Golgi. Golgi’s stain enables the visualization of dendritic spines – fine protrusions along the dendrite where excitatory synapses occur. By use of genetic manipulation and Golgi staining, we can begin to tease apart the genes that shape the synaptic landscape throughout the lifespan.

IPE Award
Kunal Baxi (Cancer Biology), Nicole Hensch (IBMS – Cell Biology, Genetics & Molecular Medicine), and Amanda Lipsitt (Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Clinical Fellow)

Glow Fish Glow
This image shows a 5 day old zebrafish embryo that has been genetically modified to express red, blue, and yellow fluorescent proteins from a transgenic cassette (Brainbow). The gene encoding each fluorescent protein is flanked by two pairs of lox sites that are recognized by the Cre recombinase. Without Cre-induced recombination, the first protein (red) in the array will be expressed. Cre expression results in one of three outcomes: red (no recombination), blue (recombination event 1), or yellow (recombination event 2). When additional copies of the Brainbow cassette are inserted into a cell, these three primary colors can be mixed, thereby increasing possible color combinations. This diversity of color using a single promoter provides a powerful platform for studying a variety of biological processes such as neuronal morphology and cell lineage tracking. We use this system as a tool to study heterogeneity of cells within a soft tissue tumor (rhabdomyosarcoma) using zebrafish as a model system.

 

Briscoe Library’s 2nd Annual Image of Research Photography Competition came to a close with an awards reception during the library’s Fiesta Celebration on Thursday, April 11th. All entrants, Image of Research Judges, contest sponsors, students, faculty, and staff were invited to come view the entries, meet the winners, and enjoy refreshments.

3D Printing Demo for Dental Students

3D print services in the Library are really taking off.  For this reason, staff librarians are offering more demonstrations for students to get up to speed with the process of creating 3D print objects for class assignments and individual research projects. Shown here with Dental Hygiene students are Kelley Minars, Creative Technologies Librarian, and John Weed, Head of Simulation and Immersion Technology.

For most of the current 3D print projects, there are no charges. The Library has, however, acquired a second 3D printer with more print options to meet the increasing demands. The new printer will use an increased variety of print filament and colors which may make it necessary to add a nominal charge for print projects using the new printer in the future.

For information on how to submit a file for 3D print projects click here.

Stay tuned for more 3D print announcements!

4th Annual History of Medicine in Poetry

April 20th @ 6:00 – Library 5th Floor Howe Conference Room

Readings From Original & Classic Poems

Sponsored by the History of Medicine Society

Contact Peg Seger at segerp@uthscsa.edu or 210-567-6398

ALCEP Funds Provide More E-Resources for UT Health Libraries

The UT Health San Antonio Libraries have acquired several new e-resources through a purchase by the University of Texas System utilizing funds from the Academic Library Collection Enhancement Program (ALCEP). The funds for this program are allocated by the state Board of Regents for one-time collection purchases.

This year’s ALCEP fund purchases include:

 

Book Giveaway December 5-9

 Briscoe Library will have a book giveaway December 5 – 9.

BookGiveaway

The book giveaway will start at 9 a.m. on Monday, December 5 at the entrance of the library and will continue through Friday, December 9.

Books to be included in the giveaway are old editions withdrawn from the library’s collection or donations given to the library, yet not needed for the collection. All give-away books are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Feel free to bring bags to carry books since there will be plenty to choose from!

For more information about the book give-away, contact Andrea N. Schorr,
Head of Resource Management, at 567-2400 or at 
schorr@uthscsa.edu

Book Giveaway January 13-20

 Briscoe Library will have a book giveaway January 13 – 20.

BookGiveaway

The book giveaway will start at 9 a.m. on Friday, January 13 at the entrance of the library and will continue through Friday, January 20 until 4 p.m.

Books to be included in the giveaway are old editions withdrawn from the library’s collection or donations given to the library, yet not needed for the collection. All give-away books are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Feel free to bring bags to carry books since there will be plenty to choose from!

For more information about the book give-away, contact Andrea N. Schorr,
Head of Resource Management, at 567-2400 or at 
schorr@uthscsa.edu

Briscoe Library Announces 2nd Annual Image of Research Photography Competition

 

Briscoe Library is pleased to announce its 2nd Annual Image of Research Photography Competition! This competition is an opportunity for UT Health San Antonio students, residents, and fellows from all five schools to capture, share, and present the essence of their research in a single visual image. The competition and its accompanying exhibition showcase students’ creative visual conceptualization of their research.

After the success of last year’s competition, the library plans to continue the Image of Research each year in the spring. For 2019, submissions will be accepted from February 18th through March 18th. The awards are listed as follows:
1st Place: $400
2nd Place: $300
3rd Place: $200
IPE Award: $600

Visit library.uthscsa.edu/2019/01/ior2019/ for more info.

Briscoe Library Announces 3rd Annual Image of Research Photography Competition

Briscoe Library is pleased to announce its 3rd Annual Image of Research Photography Competition! This competition is an opportunity for UT Health San Antonio students, faculty, and staff from all five schools to capture, share, and present the essence of their research in a single visual image. The competition and its accompanying exhibition showcase the UT Health San Antonio community’s creative visual conceptualization of their research.

This is the first year that faculty and staff are invited to participate, and we are excited to see your contributions. Submissions will be accepted from December 1st, 2019 through March 13th, 2020. The awards are listed as follows:
1st Place: $400
2nd Place: $300
3rd Place: $200
IPE Award: $600
Faculty/Staff Award: $400

Visit library.uthscsa.edu/2019/11/ior2020 for more info.